The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
From the Rockies to the Races: Why College Students Are Joining the Celebrity-Packed  Kentucky Derby
From the Rockies to the Races: Why College Students Are Joining the Celebrity-Packed Kentucky Derby
April 24, 2024

The Kentucky Derby, often celebrated as “the most exciting two minutes in sports,” transcends mere horse racing to become a staple of American...

Have a civil discussion about concealed carry, please

The Our View traditionally voices the Collegian Editorial Board’s unanimous opinion on an issue represented in the current day’s paper, but today that tradition is being foregone thanks to the issue of concealed-carry.

The topic of concealed-carry — and, specifically, whether it should be banned on campus — has a heated history at CSU. Concealed weapons were nearly banned in 2009, but after vocal student opposition, chose to remain one of the few college campuses allowing the practice.

Ad

It became clear during the planning meeting for this section that there would be no unanimous opinion concerning concealed-carry, and the conversation became more passionate than it has at any other time so far this school year.

There are valid arguments for and against concealed-carry on campus, but it’s important to keep the discussion respectful and civil.

On one side is the issue of citizens rights; that without justifiable cause there is no reason to strip an individual of their right to carry a firearm, especially when the law says otherwise.

The argument against concealed-carry is equally valid; that shootings on college campuses — such as the 2007 Virginia Tech shooting that left 32 dead — provide little incentive to welcome firearms onto university property.

With such entrenched and well-supported arguments, it can be easy for the discussion to quickly escalate when both sides refuse to listen to the other. But in order for this debate to progress, the rhetoric needs to be kept civil.

If not, the conversations can end in (at best) both sides offending the other or (at worst) the same violence that neither side advocates.

View Comments (11)
More to Discover

Comments (11)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *