The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
How Can Colorado Quarterback Shedeur Sanders Improve For the 2025 NFL Draft?
How Can Colorado Quarterback Shedeur Sanders Improve For the 2025 NFL Draft?
June 6, 2024

Colorado quarterback Shedeur Sanders stands out as a prime prospect for the 2025 NFL Draft, and it’s no surprise he's the current favorite...

Scream Queers delights with frights at PRISM drag show

The Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom screamed in delighted horror at the performances of “Scream Queers” for this year’s blood-curdling drag show hosted by PRISM Oct. 20. 

The drag show means a lot of different things to the students who perform in the show; for some, it is simply a way to be able to perform, sing and dance in a manner they find most comfortable. For others, it is a way to express their creativity and to simply be themselves. 

Ad

For many, this will be their first time performing in the show, but others have since become regulars for the performance. This year also marked a difference in new and experienced directors. “Scream Queers” was the last performance for director Lola Gags, who will be replaced by PRISM vice president and show producer Mira Pusateri. 

Navigate Left
Navigate Right
  • Sinclair Vandervoort helps Ash Johnson with makeup before the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Vandervoort said that “The drag show is a time for me to sort of experiment with a side of my life that I don’t always get to wear on my sleeve.” (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Hadley Frisby prepares for the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Frisby said “The drag show means a connection to the community for anyone and everyone.” (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Julio Flores prepares for the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Participants voiced that the show was about inclusion and acceptance of all people and identities. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Evelyn Evermore hosts the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Khrys’taaal performs on stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Monae Royalz performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Dirty Harry performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Dirty Harry, known as Sinclair Vandervoort offstage, performs during the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Vandervoort said “The drag show is a time for me to sort of experiment with a side of my life that I don’t always get to wear on my sleeve.” (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Dirty Harry, known as Sinclair Vandervoort offstage, performs during the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Vandervoort said “The drag show is a time for me to sort of experiment with a side of my life that I don’t always get to wear on my sleeve.” (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Dirty Harry performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Natalia Wynters performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Auntie Depressant performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • MaveRick Smith performs for the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Participants voiced that the drag show was about inclusion and acceptance of all people and identities. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Jessica L’Whor performs for the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Participants voiced that the drag show was about inclusion and acceptance of all people and identities. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • YungRaccoon performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Jolicious performs during the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Hadley Frisby, a member of Jolicious, said “The drag show means a connection to the community for anyone and everyone.” (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Jolicious performs during the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Hadley Frisby, a member of Jolicious, said “The drag show means a connection to the community for anyone and everyone.” (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Jessica L’Whor performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Jessica L’Whor performs for the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Participants voiced that the drag show was about inclusion and acceptance of all people and identities. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Plastik Beach during the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Participants voiced that the drag show was about inclusion and acceptance of all people and identities. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Juliette Flores performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Trina Tuckit performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Shiksa Mess performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Monét X Change performs at the Scream Queers drag show Oct. 20. Participants voiced that the drag show was about inclusion and acceptance of all people and identities. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Dirty Harry performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Monét X Change performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Monét X Change performs on-stage during the fall semester PRISM drag show, Scream Queers, in the Lory Student Center Grand Ballroom Oct. 20. PRISM collected donations that went to the Pride Resource Center to help fund scholarships for LGBTQ+ students. (Colin Shepherd | The Collegian)

  • Monét X Change performs for the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. Participants voiced that the drag show was about inclusion and acceptance of all people and identities. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

  • Lola Gag cries on stage after performing for the Scream Queers drag show on Oct. 20. It was Lola Gag’s last performance as director of the show. (Ryan Schmidt | The Collegian)

Navigate Left
Navigate Right

The show is also a fundraising event for the Pride Resource Center Scholarship, a scholarship independent of CSU, as CSU does not provide any LGBTQ+ scholarships. The show was hosted by Denver queens Evelyn Evermoore and Jessica L’whor, with special guest RuPauls Drag Race All Stars 4 winner Monet X Change.

The group Jolicious, consisting of Colorado State University students Jovan Vincent and Hadley Frisby, was a particularly endearing example of newcomers and drag veterans coming together to create a fun, upbeat and spooky performance. 

Frisby said she was very open to the idea of being in the show because she has been a performer all her life. Frisby said she wants to make sure to be confident in herself because she usually performs much better when she doesn’t stress about it or be nervous about it.

This year was Frisby’s first time performing in a drag show. She joined Jolicious on stage hoping to give the audience an important message. Frisby spoke passionately about her peers being her inspiration. 

Even though this was her first drag show, she still felt comfortable and ready to take the stage. Being friends with someone who has done a drag show before and is a fellow performer definitely helped bring out the true essence of their choreography. 

“I like the spooky aspect of this year’s theme,” Frisby said. “You can be creepy with it and (be) creative with it. You can make yourself dark, but also the movement can be light. With our dance changing from something light to something spooky and dark to something that’s light is a really good message and a good story that I think we will convey well,” Frisby said. 

Frisby gave advice for those who may struggle with self-confidence but want to be performers: “I would say get a group of people. You don’t have to be the star of the show if you want to, but you can have your own moments if you want to. Your friends will help you and support you during the process.”

Having this show on CSU’s campus is important to members and allys of this community. Frisby said, “I think because since there is a large LGBTQ+ community, this is a way to bring those people who are in that community together and supporters as well.”

Ad

Auntie Depressant, a drag queen and producer of the show, mentioned the importance of the donations and fundraising part of the show. Audiences were able to throw money on stage during performances. 

“I think it’s really important for people to know this is a fundraising event. It’s the only fundraising event for the Pride Resource Center, it’s the only fundraising for the scholarship, there’s no LGBTQ scholarships provided by CSU only outside scholarships, especially in today’s climate at CSU it’s really important for people to know that this is a resource.”

For Jovan Vincent, the PRISM drag show is not a new feat; in fact, this is his third year performing. Although he’s been performing for around two or three years now, he came into the drag world with trepidation stemming from being raised by parents who were both pastors. After seeing it for the first time, he became inspired by the openness and  creativity he saw on display.

“Because of that aspect of feeling so open, I was like ‘This is normal,’” Vincent said.

Vincent also credits the drag show as one of the main reasons that helped him come out to his friends and family as a member of the LGBTQ+ community. Initially, drag was a way for Vincent to express himself through hip-hop dancing and dressing up, but as he went on, he began to develop artistically.

“Now, it almost seems natural to me,” Vincent said. “It’s just so fun now.” 

What went from just simply wanting to perform became a desire for meaning behind the performance. His performances can take anywhere from a week to two weeks to prepare, with three or more hours of prep work for makeup and costuming.

I’ve always been a bit of a ham, so I always have confidence when I try to do a lot of things. … I’m still very worried, but you gotta just do what you gotta do.”-Ash Johnson, performing in drag as Plastik Beach

“I’m naturally a creative person,” Vincent said. “I love doing art. I can have that characteristic of myself show in the show.” 

As far as lessons learned in his time in drag, Vincent has one big takeaway: learn to do your own makeup.

“When people try to do makeup for you, they do makeup that they do for themselves, which doesn’t always fit with you,” Vincent said.

He said that over the years, he’s simply collected what he’s learned and just added onto his makeup process. One piece of advice Vincent has for younger performers or people interested in drag is simply have fun and don’t be scared.

“In the end, when you’re up on that stage, and you did what you came here to do, then hearing everybody cheering and screaming for you, it’s honestly a magical experience that you will enjoy the best and the fullest,” Vincent said.

Even performers who have participated in previous drag shows feel their fair share of nerves before the show. Sinclaire Vandervoort, who performs in drag as Dirty Harry, said self-doubt can be quieted by remembering how welcoming and supportive the community is. 

“For me, it’s always sort of like a question,” Vandervoort said. “I’ve only really started being very open about my LGBT identity since coming to CSU, and even then, not always. … Even though I know that this is an awesome community full of great people who are super accepting, there are always those questions before I go on stage where its like, ‘Oh, what if someone I know is in the audience and they don’t like it?’ That always runs through my head. … I think at the end of the day, it’s a great community.”

The show was Vandervoort’s second year performing in drag. Vandervoort highlighted the importance the show has for creating visibility for the LGBTQ+ community, but also the show’s importance as an outlet for personal freedom.

“It’s very empowering to say the least,” Vandervoort said. “It makes me feel like I can be comfortable no matter which version of myself I choose to put out there, that there’s some sort of acceptance or acknowledgment that comes with that.”

Ash Johnson, who performed alongside Dirty Harry as Plastik Beach, proved that confidence can go a long way — especially when it comes to trying new things. Johnson’s mantra for self-assurance is to silence the negative self-doubt and just give it your all. 

“I’ve always been a bit of a ham, so I always have confidence when I try to do a lot of things,” Johnson said. “I’m still very worried, but you gotta just do what you gotta do.” 

Ash Johnson, with the drag name Plastik Beach was a first time performer at the drag show. Johnson was very comfortable and excited to get to experience the drag show. Plastik Beach gave a jaw dropping performance Russian kick dance.

“Last year I saw one queen do poy on stage, so like anyone can come over and do whatever even if you’re not as good as some of the freaking pros around here just do the stupid Fortnite dances whatever and you’ll be fine,” said Johnson.

Ty Davis, Elena Waldman and Emily Pisqui can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com or on Twitter @TyDavisACW, @WaldmanElena and @emilypisq15. 

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *