The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
Lando Norris in Miami. Accident win or the birth of a new star?
May 17, 2024

  On May 5, 2024, an essential event for Formula 1 occurred in Miami. One of the favorites of the world public, the Briton Lando...

Fort Collins Symphony presents season 69 of Odyssey: Sound Travels

Hsing-ay Hsu (right) shaking Wes Kenney’s hand (left) after a performance. Shot by Lyra Wiley.

Wes Kenney has been a music conductor for close to 50 years. Through his conductor position, he has had opportunities to perform all around the world in places like China, the Czech Republic and France. These trips have taught him how cultural differences can affect how Western music is perceived.

Now in continuation with his position as a music professor at Colorado State University, he directed a Masterworks 3 concert, “London to Leningrad” Saturday, Feb. 2.

Ad

The program, which was held at the Lincoln Center, combined strings and wind instruments to play music from George Frideric Handel, Igor Stravinsky and Dmitri Shostakovich.

“The music explains itself quite clearly, and I encourage people to research the music that they love because these master composers spent a lifetime learning and researching and experimenting.” -Hsing-ay Hsu, professional pianist

“In this concert, we are featuring our winds more. Handel’s ‘Music for the Royal Fireworks’ is stately and tuneful and easy for the audience to grasp in its pageantry,” Kenney said. “Stravinsky’s ‘Concerto for Piano and Wind Instrument’ is a rarely played work, but it a workout for everyone. Jazz influences and blatant dissonance are combined with virtuosic pyrotechnics from all involved.”

Norman Gonzales, the principal flute artist, has been performing for the Fort Collins Symphony for six seasons.

“Performing is such a rush,” Gonzales said. “You only have one shot to execute the notes you have to play in a given piece. I’m up there doing what I love to do, but at the same time, I’m sharing this great music.”

The first half of the concert also featured guest artist and pianist, Hsing-ay Hsu. She first performed at the age of four and has since played at venues like Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center.

“Initially when I played, I just wanted to do a good job,” Hsu said. “Over the years, however, it became about making a deep emotional connection with people from all walks of life. As an immigrant, it was very difficult to find a social in, but through great music, I found that I could share a great moment with just about anybody.”

Hsu, who played Stravinsky during the second part of the program, “Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments,” said that her music might be intimidating for people who are unfamiliar with it. “The music explains itself quite clearly, and I encourage people to research the music that they love because these master composers spent a lifetime learning and researching and experimenting,” Hsu said.

For resident Jordana Barrack, the Masterworks concert was her first time seeing the Fort Collins Symphony. After waiting months, she was finally able to see her friends, Forest Greenough and Bennett Stucky perform bass and violin respectively.

“It was a really interesting experience,” Barrack said. “The music puts you in this trance, this state, where your mind begins to wander a little bit. You wander between listening to the specific notes that are happening to your to-do list or your thoughts for the day.”

Ad

More information about the Fort Collins Symphony and their events can be found on their concert page.

Lyra Wiley can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com and on Twitter @lyra_wiley.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *