CSU’s Omicron Tau chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha hosts Rams for Social Justice discussion

Isabelle Rayburn

On Monday, Feb. 26, the Omicron Tau chapter the of Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity held an event called Rams for Social Justice on campus.

The event explained what social justice is and how Colorado State students can make a change of how they feel on campus.

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During the discussion, the speakers discussed how social justice has had a large impact  on culture both today and in the past.

Students gather together at the event Ram’s for Social Justice put on by the Omicron Tau Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Incorporated to discuss these topics of social movements and justice at Colorado State University on Feb. 26.

“Social Justice is important because no one should be put in an unfair disadvantage because of who they are for no reason,” said Aaron Allen, a sophomore student studying biomedical engineering and chemical biological engineering. “It would help communicate to the general public, given that we are on a predominately white institution, that we’re here too and that this is our space and we need to feel like this is our space.”

The speakers emphasized that social justice is about how communities come together to change a problem as a whole.

“There’s going to be generations after us,” CSU alumna T’Hani Jenae said. “I think that the children are really important at this time, especially when we’re seeing that we came out of what we thought was this post-racial era, or what half the world thought was this post- racial era, and the kids are really confused. We’re teaching the kids a lot of hate, and that’s not the kind of things that we need to be passing down, and so that’s why social justice is really important in terms of passing down to generations.”

We’re teaching the kids a lot of hate, and that’s not the kind of things that we need to be passing down, and so that’s why social justice is really important in terms of passing down to generations.” -T’Hani Jenae, CSU alumna

During the second hour of the event, students and participants shared their experiences with programs they were in surrounding social justice issues.

“We all start in a place where we want to have a collective discussion,” senior social work major  and women studiesminor Zelle Moore said. “And, we start talking about it and we just know that this knowledge needs to get out. People need to know that something isn’t correct here and we need to work to change.”

Moore advises that if you want to start a movement on your own, “work on yourself because working on yourself will improve a movement.”

 

Collegian reporter Isabelle Rayburn can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com or on Twitter @Seiss_Diosaa.