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The Importance of Supporting Engineering Education
The Importance of Supporting Engineering Education
February 20, 2024

In today's era of information technology, engineering plays the role of a vanguard, trying to optimize processes and develop new products, making...

Daydreams and video games could be good for your brain

(source)
(source)

Many people grow up being yelled at for drifting off in class at least once during their educational careers. However, Tom Kelly, IDEO founder David Kelly and Researcher Jonathan Schooler of the University of California, Santa Barbara argue that daydreaming, as well as playing video games, may actually help the brain’s ability to reason through difficult problems and situations. 

“Daydreaming has problem-solving power. Sometimes it helps to stop focusing so intently on an issue, and aim for what IDEO founder David Kelley’s mentor Bob McKim used to call “relaxed attention.” In that mental state, the problem or challenge occupies space in your brain, but not on the front burner,” Tom and David write in their new book “Creative Confidence” to be released this week.

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Video games also provide the brain with the practice needed to approach a problem from many different angles in order to find the best way to solve it, according to the article.

To read more about how daydreaming and video games could enhance your everyday life click here. 

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