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VIDEO: Mountain lion in tree at Rogers Park

A mountain lion sits in a cage near Rogers park  awaiting transport after being tranquilized on Thursday, March 6, 2014.
A mountain lion sits in a cage near Rogers park awaiting transport after being tranquilized on Thursday, March 6, 2014.

Video by CTV Reporter Katie Spencer

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UPDATE: At around 4 p.m. Thursday, the Department of Wildlife tranquilized the small mountain lion and are returning the animal back to its habitat. The mountain lion is estimated to be one to two-years-old due to its size and spots.

According to officers at the scene, this is not a rare incident.

If you or anyone you know comes in contact with a mountain lion, you should make yourself big, make noise and slowly back away.

Original Story: At around 2:45 p.m. Thursday a small juvenile mountain lion, roughly 50 pounds, was spotted in a tree at Rogers Park. According to Fort Collins Police Department, the mountain lion was earlier seen at City Park and made its way to Rogers Park.

FCPD is on scene, ensuring the animal does not get too aggressive and threaten the surrounding neighborhood.

“At this point it is not at all active or aggressive; it’s just sitting in a tree, chilling out, doing just about nothing,” said Officer Santo Stefano, FCPD.

Officers arrived on scene before the Department of Wildlife to observe the mountain lion and to ensure it does not harm anyone.

The Department of Wildlife is deciphering how to best handle the situation, so the mountain lion doesn’t receive harm.

“The plan at this point is to try and capture it and get it back out into the hills,” Officer Stefano said.

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