Fort Collins’ great wall of tea

It was four years ago that George Grossman coined the name “Happy Lucky’s Teahouse and Treasures.” With his obvious love for tea and his heart for the poor Grossman envisioned a place where people could come together, share their lives with one another and make a connection over tea.

“The concept is what I call being beyond blood,” Grossman, owner of Happy Lucky’s Teahouse and Treasures, said, explaining the heart behind his business.

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CSU alumni Johannah Racz uses the teahouse as a second office — a getaway.

“I come here as much as I can,” Racz said. “If I ever feel down, I tell myself I need to go to the teahouse.”

With his business, Grossman wanted to support non-profit Sustainable Schools International. As co-founder and treasurer of the non-profit organization, Grossman’s life and business is connected strongly to its cause. At least 10% of the Lucky’s profits go to education for children in Cambodia.

The store has over 180 teas to choose from making Happy Lucky’s the biggest selection in Colorado.

When you walk in you notice the soothing sound of the neo-jazz music playing and the natural smell of fresh teas and spices. To make your selection you search through what Grossman has named “The Great Wall of Tea.”

The employees are dressed in casual silk vest and tan slacks and there are murals on and around the doorways and walls.

The design of the teahouse resemble different cultures from all around the globe which creates an atmosphere that Grossman said is part of the business.

“The world gathers around tea,” Grossman said.

Grossman imports tea from Darjeeling India, Kenya, Venezuela Ecuador and chinese importers. He tries to buy from organizations that support education in poor areas of other countries. Many of the teas are blends created straight from the teahouse.

“The idea that these teas come from all over the world can expand our thoughts that we are apart of the whole global world,” Grossman said.

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According to Grossman, they sell teas for many occasions. One for waking up, one for relaxing, one for vitality and many more.

“The coolest thing for students is the connection,” Grossman said.

With its free wifi he noted that students and groups sometimes come in to complete assignments or study.

“One of the coolest thing that happens is when students come in and meet each other… we get the feeling that we made that happen,” Grossman said.

Coining the term “social entrepreneurism,” he opened the tea house and Sustainable Schools International and a publishing company. Through the publishing company his wife has published a book discussing their story about adopting two children from Cambodia and India.

Their connection to orphans from other nations is not just a part of their business, but it is also a part of thier family. Grossman and his wife adopted their son from at 9 months of age and he is now 13. Their daughter in 9 and from india.

“Ultimately we’re all one,” Grossman said.

When you believe that and are aware of that, he said adopting a child is easy. He called this attitude, “being beyond blood.”

“When you come our gift might be the tea, but really it’s feeling happy and lucky,” Grossman said.

Collegian Reporter Shawn Brown can be reached at news@collegian.com.