Second presidential debate more controversial than first

Logan Crizer

The second presidential debate occurred Sunday night with both candidates publicly attacking each other’s views and speaking on both the newly released scandals and their policy plans.

The debate covered many topics including the environmental, tax reform, healthcare reform, islamophobia, syrian refugees, sexism and racism in the U.S.

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Additionally, the debates covered more controversial topics that dove into recent scandals on both candidates, such as the Trump tape and Clinton’s email scandal.

The Trump tape, which was released on Friday Oct. 7 by the Washington Post, showed a conversation Trump had on a bus with Billy Bush of “Access Hollywood” in which he discussed groping woman’s genitals and sexually assaulting women.

Anderson Cooper the moderator from CNN, began the online questions segment by bringing up the recent scandal.

“We received a lot of questions online, Mr. Trump, about the tape that was received on Friday,” Cooper said. “As you can imagine, where you called what you said locker room banter, you described kissing women without consent and grabbing their genitals, that is sexual assault. You bragged that you have sexually assaulted women, do you understand that?” Cooper said.

Trump changed the subject, bringing up ISIS and attempting to downplay his scandal by bringing up his plan to defeat the terrorist group.

Clinton responded to the scandal as well.

“We have seen him insult women, rate women on their appearance ranking them from 1-10. We’ve seen him embarrass women on TV and Twitter,” Clinton said. “We saw him after the first debate denigrating former miss universe in the harshest most personal terms. So, yes, this is who Donald Trump is,” Clinton said.

Martha Raddatz, a moderator and reporter from ABC news, brought up Hillary’s email scandal. Clinton defended herself by saying it was a mistake.

“Obviously, if I were to do it over again, I would not. I’m not making any excuses. It was a mistake,” Clinton said.

Trump responded to the question as well, attacking Clinton’s statements and calling her a liar.

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After the scandals had both been covered for each party, the public questions were asked about health care and taxes. Both candidates covered their plans for reform on the topics. Clinton noted making reforms to both systems, while Trump proposed shutting down Obamacare and reforming the current taxes.

Gorba Hamid, a member of the audience, asked about islamophobia in the U.S.

“You’ve mentioned working with Muslim nations, but with islamophobia on the rise, how will you help people like me deal with the consequences of being a threat to the country after the election is over?”

Trump explained his stance on the situation, explaining that he believes muslims should report dangerous activity.

“You’re right about Islamophobia and that’s a shame …. we have to be sure that muslims come in and report when they see something going on,” Trump said. “When they see hatred going on, they have to report it.”

Clinton discussed her support for American muslims and the struggle they have been experiencing.

“I’ve worked with a lot of different Muslim groups around America,” Clinton said. “I’ve met with a lot of them and heard how important it is for them to feel they are wanted and included and part of our country, part of our homeland security and that’s what I want to see.”

The candidates then discussed the Syrian refugee crisis, with Trump supporting a stricter enforcement policy and Clinton endorcing more efforts being made to help the victims.

“I think Donald is getting very off topic with at hand and he is straying away from the topics since he can’t back up for justify his past wrongs. He is talking nonsense,” said Grace, a CSU student who asked to remain anonymous.

The debate ended with a handshake as both opponents went to greet supporters.

Collegian reporter Logan Crizer @logloc19.