YART sale gives emerging artists chance to sell, promote work

Elena Waldman

Editor’s Note: In the original article, it was falsely written that Kindra Weisbrod was an alum of CSU, painted full time and has been showing art since being a student. The article has been corrected to Weisbrod being an alum of CU Denver, painting part-time and showing art since April 2018. The Collegian sincerely regrets the mistakes. 

If culture and community are what Fort Collins residents are looking for, the Downtown Artery has them covered.

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displayed art
The Artery in downtown Fort Collins hosts a Yart sale where local artists have the opportunity to sell their work for under 100 dollars. (Matt Begeman | Collegian)

This past weekend the eclectic gallery on Linden Street featured several local artists in their quarterly YART sale, giving the local art community a venue to showcase and sell their art. With each piece priced under $100, the gallery was not only affordable but an interesting walkthrough of some of the most unique art Fort Collins has to offer.

The YART sale was originally conceptualized almost a decade ago by the Downtown Artery cofounder and CSU grad Amy Bradley, who collaborated with friends to create a cheap art sale out of their college art portfolios. Bradley said they thought of the idea while they were sitting around a campfire. Ready to burn their prints in the fire, they decided to sell it for a low price instead. 

“We realized there wasn’t a great avenue for emerging artists or just artists in general,” Bradley said. “When I was still in school, galleries were closing left and right. It was not very encouraging, to be honest. The way that we’re gonna allow for art to stay is gonna be by refocusing on the worth. Not the economic worth, but by realizing that artists make things meaningful. Imagine this place [Fort Collins] without public art—it would be so boring.

”The way that we’re gonna allow for art to stay is gonna be by refocusing on the worth. Not the economic worth, but by realizing that artists make things meaningful. Imagine this place [Fort Collins] without public art—it would be so boring.” -Amy Bradley, co-founder of YART sale

Although she is not a working artist, Bradley said as an art advocate, she is very much aware of the motivation it takes to succeed in the industry. Because it is important for artists to have as much opportunity as possible, there is no vetting process or certain qualifications necessary to participate in the YART sale. Artists of all levels and experience are encouraged to apply and showcase their work at the event.

“You want as many eyes seeing your work as possible because you want name recognition,” Bradley said. “The only way you can do that is by getting your work in a lot of places. Take as many opportunities as you can, and take yourself seriously—treat your art like a business.

displayed art
The Artery in downtown Fort Collins hosts a Yart sale where local artists have the opportunity to sell their work for under 100 dollars. As you walk in the door there are profiles and pictures of each artist that is apart of the sale. (Matt Begeman | Collegian)

From photographers to printmakers, the artists at the YART sale took Bradley’s advice. Photographer Nicole Ryan was selling original photos printed on small blocks of wood, an idea she came up while experimenting with different kinds of digital and film photography. She said the process of transferring photos to wood canvases requires meticulous care and a very specific creative direction.

Because her work is so thorough and tedious, Ryan is very particular about what photos she takes. Ryan said she gets inspiration from light and nature; many of her prints are landscape photos of different things she finds outside, such as mountains and buildings.

“As an artist, I feel like everywhere I go, everything inspires me,” Ryan said. “Nature really inspires me. When I’m out and about, I’ll notice the way a light hits a building or the way a light hits a field, and I’ll always want to stop and take photos. I’m inspired by light and shapes, so a lot of the times I do landscape. Another thing I’m drawn for is texture in images, and the details you can capture.”

For inquiries about the YART sale, Amy Bradley can be reached via email at amy@downtownartery.com

Expressionist painter Kindra Weisbrod is an in-house artist at the Downtown Artery. Her pieces combine vibrant color and text to evoke a sense of chaos, bringing her most visceral thoughts and emotions to life. Focusing on subjects such as politics, breakups and anxiety, Weisbrod says that expressing herself through art can be very empowering. 

two people looking at art
The Artery in downtown Fort Collins hosts a Yart sale where local artists have the opportunity to sell their work for under 100 dollars. (Matt Begeman | Collegian)

“Some artists describe me as an expressionist,” Weisbrod said. “I just kind of look at a blank canvas, and whatever I feel I just put on there. It usually ties into my personal beliefs and values. Any avenue I have where I can stand up for what I believe in, I use.” 

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Before Weisbrod pursued painting part- time, she was a psychology graduate at CU Denver. Upon breaking into the art scene in April of 2018, she painted at local art competitions and started showcasing her work at smaller art shows. Weisbrod moved her business into the Downtown Artery where she continues to build her gallery. For those who are interested in her work, she can be reached via the Downtown Creative District’s “Connect with a Creative” portal at or through her Instagram, @artbykindra.

Along with having the ability to manifest her feelings into physical form, Weisbrod said her favorite thing about creating art is seeing it resonate with other people. 

For inquiries about the YART sale, Amy Bradley can be reached via email at amy@downtownartery.com

“In the end, what I really like is that whatever I’m feeling, and whatever shows up, the fact that it’s resonating with people,” Weisbrod said. “Whether it’s connecting with their anger or frustration, or to their own feelings of worth or lack of worth. What matters to me is that something is conveyed.”

Elena Waldman can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com and on Twitter @waldmanelena.