The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
How Can Colorado Quarterback Shedeur Sanders Improve For the 2025 NFL Draft?
How Can Colorado Quarterback Shedeur Sanders Improve For the 2025 NFL Draft?
June 6, 2024

Colorado quarterback Shedeur Sanders stands out as a prime prospect for the 2025 NFL Draft, and it’s no surprise he's the current favorite...

CSU responds: Why are students so obsessed with stickers?

Colorado State University students are obsessed with stickers. They will put stickers on just about anything. From laptops, to water bottles, to everything in between, stickers are there.

“If I see a sticker that I am interested in on someone’s belongings, I already have a talking point with that specific person,” said Mike Canbull, a sophomore studying engineering at CSU. “People show off their stickers of interest for a reason, so might as well ask them about it and learn something new about them.”

Ad

Laptop covered in stickers.
Laptops covered in stickers are an essential from of expression for many Colorado State University students. (Megan Daly | Collegian)

Miranda Cortez, a junior at CSU studying human development and family studies, said stickers are a way to identify your interests.

“Stickers are a really cool aspect of someone’s life because you get to learn a lot about someone based on the type of stickers they choose to show off,” Cortez said. “You can discover what they are involved with on campus, what they are passionate about, what music they are interested in, or what movies and TV shows they like.”

Kendall Hull, a junior business major at CSU, said stickers are a great way to promote a brand.

Three water bottles covered in stickers.
Water bottles, all shapes and sizes, are no exception to the sticker craze. (Megan Daly | Collegian)

“(Stickers) are good when it comes to getting the name of a brand out in society,” Hull said. “Sticker marketing is a good idea when it comes to generating interest within someone because they simply saw a fascinating sticker.”

With all the hype orbiting around stickers, there are those students who are opposed to the use of stickers on everyday items.

“As someone who is against the use of stickers on their water bottles or laptop case, I do not understand why so many college students are obsessed with stickers,” said Grant Tanner, a freshman undeclared major at CSU. “Nothing is more gross than seeing someone’s old, gross sticker on their water bottle.”

Patricia Brown, a senior zoology major, said stickers make a clean and organized space look cluttered and messy.

Laptop covered in stickers
Laptops covered in stickers are an essential from of expression for many Colorado State University students. (Megan Daly | Collegian)

“When I see someone’s laptop case with a ton of stickers layered on top of each other it gives me anxiety,” Brown said. “The fact that some stickers are not very removable also weirds me out. You know those ones where you take off a sticker and the white (paper) stuff is still on the object? That is the worst.”

Despite liking or disliking stickers, Leslie Waters, a freshman at CSU studying biology, said there are some funny ones out there.

Ad

“Once I saw a sticker on a lady’s water bottle that said, “less upsetti and more spaghetti,”” Waters said. “Whenever I am having a hard day, I always think about that one sticker. That sticker changed my life.”

Mareena Winchell can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com or on Twitter @mareenaaaa_.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *