The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
The Impact of Technological Innovations on Sports Betting in Colorado: A Primer
The Impact of Technological Innovations on Sports Betting in Colorado: A Primer
April 18, 2024

In the sports betting domain, Colorado stands as a unique arena where technological advancements have significantly reshaped the landscape. As...

ASCSU Elections: Meet speaker of senate candidate Enock Monanti

ASCSU+Speaker+of+the+Senate+Candidate+Enock+Monati+poses+for+a+photo.
Collegian | Cait Mckinzie
Associated Students of Colorado State University speaker of the senate candidate Enock Monanti poses for a photo March 22.

Editor’s Note: This article is part of The Collegian’s 2024 ASCSU elections coverage. Search 2024 ASCSU elections on collegian.com to see complete coverage of all other candidates.

With campaigns for the Associated Students of Colorado State University elections for the 2024-25 academic year fully underway, The Collegian sat down with speaker of the senate candidate Enock Monanti to discuss his background, campaign platforms and future plans if elected.

Ad

Monanti is a sophomore studying biology and currently serves as the chair of the Diversity & Inclusion Affairs Committee and a senator for the Black/African American Cultural Center. 

Background, ASCSU experience, qualifications

Monanti: I have helped work on writing legislation such as the Lavender Cabinet bill, … and I sponsored and endorsed a fair bit of bills that have come my way in that organization as well.

When it comes to being in the senate, I’ve known a lot of the people there. I’ve worked a lot with individuals, generally just giving the advice, looking over to the bills … (and) pointing out, like, “Hey, maybe you want to do this; maybe you might want to talk to these people as well.” When it comes to that sort of stuff, as well as running my own committee — which, while not nearly as grand, it is running — senate is decently a lot of leadership experience within that space, as I basically have to make sure that decorum is held, that conversation is germane, that the agenda that is created for that committee is accurate, up to date, all that stuff, which is a part of the speaker’s job.

Outside of the space, when it comes to leadership positions, I know that I typically never play the main leader, but I am good at supporting. In (the Pride Resource Center), I work as an Amplify mentor. So when it comes to that situation, … that work experience, … it has definitely taught me how to interact and basically run things.

Campaign platform, campus issues, priorities

Monanti: I wouldn’t say that I’m running on an issue — more so that I am running on three ideals: just, fair and fun, which (are) mostly the three things that I’m upholding.

So just and fair: Obviously, I want legislation to be seen with (as) much impartiality as possible so that students can actually see (that) the bills that are being written for students (are) actually equitable and … that all voices and all sides and concerns are addressed when the bill is in senate.

(For) fair, … everything is being seen as equitable. (Making) us fun (was) the more interesting of the three — … making the space a lot more comfortable, making it a lot more inviting for students outside of ASCSU (so) you could just… come and sit and watch and even have a side conversation while (senate is) going on (with) legislation that could potentially impact them. I wanted (it) to be a space where people feel OK to express (their) opinions.

My top two concerns would be generally student engagement and communications. I feel like communication can definitely be done better between all three branches … as well as communication throughout our student population about what we actually do and, like, where we are, where we exist, what things are being seen. … I want to see a lot more students involved in the organization. Like, even if they’re not like a senator or associated senator or hold a position within the organization, I would love to hear a lot more (about) their involvement, a lot more of their voice, have a lot more of just them in the space. 

Ad

ASCSU/student relationship, ASCSU future goals

Monanti: From what I understand of that organization, … I can tell you there are senators who’ve been there far longer than I in my one-year tenure. ASCSU (is) a slow-changing organization, but … I foresee it changing for the better, to be more open, to be more inviting. I foresee … a future of a lot more student engagement from outside of people who are just naturally a part of the association and the organization. And I hope my goals can further that along. I really want to make massive strides. But I also understand that strides come with baby steps.

I want to make senate a better place. I want it to be a more open place. I want students there. I want people to know that senate exists and that it’s a part of campus that gives students a say on how their fees are spent and gives students a voice in the administration.

And at the end of the day, no matter how elections go, there’s someone who’s going to be there for you, and you should make your voice heard.

Reach Allie Seibel and Aubree Miller at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @CSUCollegian

Leave a Comment
More to Discover
About the Contributor
Allie Seibel
Allie Seibel, Editor in Chief
Allie Seibel is the editor in chief of The Rocky Mountain Collegian, a role she loves more and more with each day. Previously the news editor and news director of The Collegian, Seibel has a background in news, but she’s excited to branch out and experience every facet of content this and following years. Seibel is a sophomore journalism and media communications major minoring in business administration and legal studies. She is a student in the Honors Program and is also an honors ambassador and honors peer mentor. She also is a satellite imagery writer for the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University. Seibel is from Colorado Springs, Colorado, and loves how The Collegian has gotten her acquainted with Fort Collins and CSU. When she’s not writing, reporting or in class, you can always find her with a book, cross-stitching, planning where to travel to next, trying out a new recipe or listening to Taylor Swift. Seibel is incredibly proud of The Collegian’s past and understands the task of safeguarding its future. She’s committed to The Collegian’s brand as an alt-weekly newspaper and will continue to advance its status as a strong online publication while preserving the integrity and tradition of the print paper. Seibel is excited to begin a multi-year relationship with readers at the helm of the paper and cannot wait to see how the paper continues to grow. Through initiatives like the new science desk and letting each individual desk shine, Seibel is committed to furthering The Collegian and Rocky Mountain Student Media over the next few years.

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *