ASCSU president vetoes bill regarding elections manager position

Stuart Smith

Following the veto of a job description bill by Associated Students of Colorado State University President Tristan Syron, the Senate decided to scrap it and rewrite the job description next semester.

The bill, which would change the job description of the Elections Manager, who runs the ASCSU elections in the second half of spring semester, passed through the Senate 44-0-1 last week.

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Because President Syron was in Denver for CSU’s Board of Governors meeting, Chief of Staff Zachary Vaishampayan read his veto message to the Senate.

“This (veto) didn’t need to happen,” Syron wrote. “This bill was brought to the floor, expedited and delivered to me without ever getting the chance to read it prior… I hope this veto is the exception, not the norm.”

There was a laundry list of problems with the original bill President Syron vetoed, including unclear hours and higher requirements for the job than in the past, such as GPA. Under that bill, the Elections Manager would also be paid $25 an hour, assuming they stop working after the election is over. In total, the job would last eight weeks.

“This (veto) didn’t need to happen. This bill was brought to the floor, expedited and delivered to me without ever getting the chance to read it prior… I hope this veto is the exception, not the norm.” – Tristan Syron, Associated Students of Colorado State University President

After the explanation for the veto, the Senate voted almost unanimously to reverse the previous decision. Budgetary Affairs Committee Chair Alissa Threatt then introduced a revised version of the bill with relevant changes addressing those concerns. 

Some of those included changing the last date of the job description from May 31 to the end of elections, removing some repeated requirements, lowering the required GPA for the job from 2.5 to 2.25, with preferred GPAs of 2.5 or 2.75, and lowering the compensation for the job from $25 to $16.20 an hour.

A motion was made to expedite the bill so the Senate would vote on it that night, but they instead chose to vote on the bill next semester because only a few Senators had actually read the bill for themselves.

Syron’s campaign slogan while running for President was “setting the standard,” and he said that carried through into his administration as well. But according to him, the Senate failed at that.

“No bill should ever reach my desk with some of the glaring mistakes I see,” Syron wrote. “In the future, I expect us to critically evaluate pay, hours and job tasks to a higher degree… it doesn’t meet the standards that I promised the student body I would adhere to.”

Stuart Smith can be reached at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @stuartsmithnews