The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
How to Increase eCommerce Sales with SEO
How to Increase eCommerce Sales with SEO
February 28, 2024

With the development of the online shopping market, SEO has become a crucial factor in driving targeted traffic and increasing sales. Effective...

‘Mirror Through Time’ showcases jazz development, experiments

As part of Colorado State University’s Homecoming week, the University Center for the Arts hosted the “Jazz Ensembles Concert: The Mirror Through Time” in the Griffin Concert Hall Thursday, Oct. 3.

The presentation featured an ensemble concert played by students and special guests, conducted by CSU music instructors Wil Swindler and Shilo Stroman. Without any delay, Swindler immediately launched the concert into “Stompin’ At The Savoy” by Edgar Sampson. 

Ad

(It was) fantastic, exciting, a little different (and) a little weird but fantastic nonetheless.” -Music Major Markus Fagerberg.

Swindler continued his session with “All of Me,” originally written by Gerald Marks and Seymour Simons; “April in Paris” by Artie Shaw; “Black Orpheus,” also known as “Manhã de Carnaval,” created by Luiz Bonfá; and “Four Brothers” by Woody Herman.

To reflect jazz’s history of remixing, recomposing and reinterpreting songs by other artists, the second part of the concert, composed by Stroman, showcased multiple compositions of the same songs, such as when the Bill Holman and Bob Graettinger versions of Glen Gray and the Casa Loma Orchestra’s “You Go to My Head” were performed.

“The point of the concert was to demonstrate the difference between large ensemble jazz music a hundred years ago and large ensemble jazz now: how it’s the same, how it’s different, how it’s developed,” Stroman said.

During Stroman’s half of the show, he conducted Benny Goodman’s “King Porter Stomp,” as well as two versions of “Sing! Sing! Sing!”

“I really enjoy jazz, and specifically the atonal stuff was really interesting to me, so I’m interested to hear what they’re presenting next time,” music major Natalie Morris said.

(The students) did great; it takes a lot of work to put these things together,” -Shilo Stroman, CSU music instructor. 

The concert was performed by CSU students with special guest features, including Jeff Jenkins, a jazz pianist and teacher at the University of Colorado Boulder. 

“(The students) did great; it takes a lot of work to put these things together,” Stroman said. “But then we come in under the pressure of a concert hall and then we see how they’re going to do, and they played great.”

The show highlighted a variety of jazz, from the energetic and bombastic to the more serene bossa nova, which is a Brazilian fusion of jazz and samba. It even included the odd-sounding, such as Graettinger’s version of “You Go to My Head.” The show highlighted how much of an effect a slight reinterpretation of a song can have.

“(It was) fantastic, exciting, a little different (and) a little weird but fantastic nonetheless,” music major Markus Fagerberg said.

Ad

Ty Davis can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com or on Twitter @TyDavisACW.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Hey, thanks for visiting Collegian.com!
We’d like to ask you to please disable your ad blocker when looking at our site — advertising revenue directly supports our student journalists and allows us to bring you more content like this.

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *