Active Lifestyles: how to stick with your exercise goals

Katy Mueller

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(Photo by Lee Scott via Unsplash.com.)

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Now that it is the beginning of April, the weather is finally warming up and it’s a great time to bring our workouts to the outdoors. Unfortunately, though, this is also right around when we might be losing some steam on our enthusiasm for achieving our various fitness goals.

Now that the excitement of setting new goals has faded, we’ve already worn our new workout clothes enough times that they aren’t new anymore and it’s getting harder and harder to find the grand motivation we once had to get out the door and to the gym. Here is how I am trying to put the drive back into my workout goals:

1. It’s not about motivation

Wait — what? Isn’t that what gets us excited? Maybe, but it shouldn’t be what you rely on to get to the gym. Motivation is great and it helps make workouts less agonizing, but it should be determination, grit and endurance that get you going. Motivation is spotty and sometimes really hard to muster up, so when it isn’t there, rely on your inner determination to do whatever it takes to reach your goals instead.

2. Switch it up

Now is around the time I re-re-remember why I hate running. I have started accumulating tight hips, an annoyance for stoplights that hold me up five minutes every block and a weird tan line. So, instead of doing the smart thing and just switching up my routine, I have found that I like to make little excuses for why I can’t run that day. If you are starting to get burnt out with your exercise of choice, change. If you run, start lifting in the gym or add some interval training. If you lift, start adding that cardio. Take a yoga class or go to group workout classes offered at the CSU Rec Center. They are honestly such a blast and I love doing them with a friend.

3. Sit back and remember why you want to do this

I don’t wake up every morning and just can’t wait till I can put myself through a hard workout. Sometimes — most times — I dread it. But you have to remember why you started. I started because I want to honor my body by keeping it as healthy as I can through eating well and exercising. Often, I get stuck on the image I see in the mirror, but at the end of the day, it shouldn’t be about that. The reason I exercise is because, yeah, sure, I want to look good in a swimsuit, but also because I want to look good and feel good, too. Why do you work out?

Collegian Blogger Katy Mueller can be reached at blog@collegian.com or on Twitter @katymueller13.