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DEA approves clinical trial to test medical marijuana effects on PTSD patients

(Photo Credit: Wikipedia)
(Photo Credit: Wikipedia)

This week the Drug Enforcement Administration made marijuana history. According to the Denver Post, the federal government has given official approval for researchers to begin a clinical trial that will test how effective medical marijuana treats PTSD.

The trial will be funded using grant money provided by Colorado’s Health Department. This money was collected from application fees paid by medical marijuana cardholders. The project is one of nine funded by the state to further understand the medicinal properties of cannabis. 

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Dr. Sue Sisley, one of the study’s leaders, has been pushing for approval of this trial for years. She is excited to begin work as early as next month when she will start enrolling veterans into the study.

“Mostly we’re just grateful that we get to see science move forward,” Sisley said. She claims to not be a marijuana activist but instead a doctor who wishes to answer questions that many PTSD patients have about treating symptoms with cannabis.

Sisley’s project is one of few that provides a group of subjects with marijuana to smoke. Most of the other state funded projects only observe patients who are already treating with marijuana.

The project will take years to complete, researchers do not expect to see published results until 2019. For more information about this clinical trial and other similar projects, check out the full story.

Collegian Green Report Blogger Capelli D’Angelo can be reached online at blogs@collegian.com.

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