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Cases against Colorado legalization pursue

English: A small courtroom in the Supreme Cour...
English: A small courtroom in the Supreme Court of the Canton of Berne, Switzerland. To the left, not shown, is the audience bench.  (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Most people in Colorado have been too distracted by the recent legalization of marijuana to notice the four main lawsuits filed against recreational use of the drug. According to the Denver Post, each of these cases claim that legalizing marijuana statewide violates the U.S. Constitution.

One case recognizes the violation of the supremacy clause, a measure of the constitution that classifies all federal law above state law. The federal government still views marijuana as a Schedule I drug, Colorado, Washington and Oregon are ignoring this classification and creating individual marijuana markets based on statewide votes.

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The lawsuits against Colorado’s marijuana markets have each been filed by an organization based out of state. Another claim these groups stand on is unregulated interstate commerce. The constitution demands that all trade be monitored by the federal government, and that trade between states can be restricted at any time.

Legalization of cannabis in various states has led to legally processed marijuana crossing borders in the hands of tourists or drug dealers. States that have not decriminalized the drug are unhappy with this trafficking, so they have filed lawsuits to control market growth.

To read more about parties suing the state of Colorado, see the full article.

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