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Lopez: AI is more of a resource than something to be penalized for

Lopez%3A+AI+is+more+of+a+resource+than+something+to+be+penalized+for
Collegian | Preston Box

Editor’s Note: All opinion section content reflects the views of the individual author only and does not represent a stance taken by The Collegian or its editorial board.

As a journalism major at Colorado State University, the closing and renovations being done in the Andrew G. Clark Building have really helped me to explore the campus a bit more; I mean, there is a need for me to walk farther than five steps to get from one classroom to another. Therefore, as I continue to walk around campus, I notice more posters for different people and programs.

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While I was walking around the Gifford Building specifically, I saw a poster created for the design and merchandising department that was attributed to be created and designed with the use of ChatGPT. However, in all of my walking around campus, I have never seen a department specifically attribute their designs or work to artificial intelligence.

“When it comes to utilizing AI as a resource for students, it is extremely beneficial to many people because it can help students with understanding complicated concepts in an easier way and with the use of editing their work if necessary.”

So as I stared at this poster, I began to wonder what departments actually condone the use of AI within the work completed by students. As a journalism student, many of my professors do not condone the use of AI and mention that I will even be penalized for it. However, the poster made me wonder if the policies are different in other departments.

The use of AI faces constant discourse as though it is something that will take over the entirety of the universe. It is like robots are going to take over the world. However, the reality is that AI — more often than not — is being used as a tool to support people and only learns as humans program information into it.

In the English department, it may be something people are split on. But is that the same with all departments, like the design and merchandising department? In relation to the CSU Student Conduct Code, there is an understanding that it is plagiarism and cheating if the work is not cited or attributed to AI. However, this is the only real outlined policy by CSU for AI use, so really, it is all connected to what the departments and, more specifically, the professors think is the best way for AI to be used.

When it comes to utilizing AI as a resource for students, it is extremely beneficial to many people because it can help students with understanding complicated concepts in an easier way and with the use of editing their work if necessary. However, that isn’t always what everyone uses it for.

The assumption is that many students are using it just to support their own needs and writing. But there is a small number of students who actually use AI as though it is their own and tarnish the reputation of it for all students.

The reality is that AI is actually an extremely beneficial tool that could be used, but very specific students challenge the uses of it. Therefore, they contribute to the way departments choose to enforce rules that apply to AI.

Reach Dominique Lopez at letters@collegian.com or on Twitter @caffeinateddee6.

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About the Contributor
Dominique Lopez
Dominique Lopez, Opinion Editor

Dominique Lopez is a third-year journalism student minoring in women’s studies and is currently the opinion editor for The Collegian.

Lopez is originally from Alamosa, Colorado, and moved to Fort Collins to attend Colorado State University. While in Fort Collins, Lopez has spent her time working for The Collegian and is a swim instructor and front desk associate at Splash Swim School.

When Lopez isn’t working or attending classes, you can find her at home reading a good book, stress baking in her kitchen or binge-watching her favorite TV shows.

She chose journalism as her field of study in the hopes that it would bring her closer to the community and provide her with the opportunity to write about what is really affecting her in that moment. Some topics she is passionate about are social justice, gender studies and finding ways to honor her community and origins through her education.

As the opinion editor, Lopez hopes to inspire new writers to be able to find their true passions in writing, as well as diversify the topics that are written about in The Collegian’s opinion section and iscuss thoughts on important issues that impact the students at Colorado State University.

Lopez is excited to pursue this new year of journalism and is eager to see what the year will bring, especially as she continues to meet new journalists pursing topics they are passionate about.

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