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Linda Nagel to discuss approaches to environmental changes

With the debate on climate change, Linda Nagel takes the approach of adapting to the current and future disposition of our climate by researching scientific-managerial approaches to changing conditions.

Nagel will host a lecture in regards to her research, entitled “A National Experiment in Manager-Scientist Partnerships to Apply a climate adaptation framework.” which will take place in the Natural and Environmental Sciences Building on March 28 from 3 p.m.-4 p.m.

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Nagel, a professor and department head for the forest and rangeland stewardship, will host a lecture in regards to her research in the Natural and Environmental Sciences Building on March 28 from 3 p.m.-4 p.m.

Nagel said her seminar will take a national-scale perspective on manager-scientist partnerships. In addition, Nagel said she will focus on her largest research, which includes different climate-adaptive approaches to forested ecosystem types.

“The approaches range from creating resistance, promoting resilience and facilitating a forests’ response to change,” Nagel said.

Nagel said she has studied both public and private sites in various locations, including red pine forests in Minnesota, northern hardwood forests in New Hampshire, longleaf pine forests in Georgia, dry mixed-conifer forests in southwest Colorado and mixed-conifer forests of northwest Montana.

Her studies include understanding how different factors within a given ecosystem will perform best under future conditions. 

In addition, Nagel said she has studied conditions Colorado has faced, such as forest insect and disease susceptibility, drought and wildfire risk.

Nagel said it is important that CSU students understand how her studies can be applied with changing conditions. Her research delves into ecosystem adaptation under uncertain conditions, and those who manage ecosystems require an understanding of this.

“No matter what type of ecosystem you work in, there are and will continue to be stressors that impact ecosystem function,” Nagel said. “(This) in turn affects the many ecosystem services we derive from them.”

Her research, therefore, is applicable to Colorado in relation to the adaptive management of ecosystems and sustainability of those ecosystems impacted by environmental variation, such as climate change.

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In addition to this research, Nagel said she is also seeking out different ways to include climate-adaptive management principles into decision making.

“I love sharing with audiences the uniqueness of this project,” Nagel said. “The fact that we’re testing (the) ecological theory on the ground and the really cool forest ecosystems we’re working on makes the research really fun.”

Nagel said she hopes to see her efforts translated to scientists and managers in the years following.

Collegian reporter Audrey Weiss can be reached at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @Audkward.

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