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Legislative overview of ASCSU presidential candidates

Colorado State University's ASCSU candidates. (Photo illustration by Rick Cookson)
Colorado State University’s ASCSU candidates. (Photos by Topher Brancaccio and Abbie Parr / Photo illustration by Rick Cookson)

During the 2015 Associated Students of Colorado State University presidential campaigns, many candidates have advocated for transparency. Many candidates’ work in ASCSU is represented in the senate, so the Collegian has compiled all of the legislation each candidate has worked on in senate.

Although some of this year’s presidential candidates have served in parts of ASCSU other than the legislative branch, all but one candidate have helped pass legislation through senate in some capacity.

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Senators have the ability to write, endorse or sponsor a bill, resolution or other piece of legislation. According to the ASCSU website, to sponsor legislation “simply means that the individual believes that this is a bill which deserves recognition and argumentation in Senate, but does not mean that the individual agrees/disagrees with the ‘Therefore’ clause(s),” and to endorse legislation “does acknowledge support for the Bill in its entirety, particularly the ‘Therefore’ clause(s).”

The following is all of the legislation that each presidential and vice-presidential candidate has either endorsed, written or sponsored during their time in ASCSU — however, it is important to note that each piece of legislation may have been contributed to by other members of ASCSU not running for office.

To view each piece of legislation in its entirety, click on its title.

Voting for ASCSU elections begins April 6 at 8 a.m. and will end April 8 at 4 p.m. Students may vote on RamWeb, in the Morgan Library or in the Lory Student Center.

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(Infographic: Kate Simmons)

 

Jason Sydoriak

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Jason Sydoriac (Photo credit: Topher Brancaccio)

Sydoriak is serving his first term in the senate. He has written or sponsored seven pieces of legislation. Three of these pieces have passed, and two resolutions are in progress.

“The relationships that I have created here in senate, being able to have those coalitions, adds a lot of force behind our voice.”

Colorado State University Police Department Complaint Procedural Reform

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(Resolution #4402, Sept. 10, 2014)

This resolution, written by Sydoriak, endorsed by King and sponsored by Yearby, established a community dialogue when filing a complaint, commendation or grievance to the CSU PD through an online form that is accessible on the main page of the CSUPD website.

This resolution was passed.

Constitutional Amendment: The Diversity Bill

(Bill #4405, Sept. 17, 2014)

Authored by Yearby and sponsored by Sydoriak, this bill sought the creation of the Students for Diversity Leadership Council to represent “underrepresented groups on campus and addressing issues of diversity and inclusion on campus.”

The council, chaired by an Executive member of ASCSU, would create two senate and four associate senate seats per office of SDPS department and Adult Learner Veteran Services Office, or a number of seats approximately 40 percent of the total academic senator and associate senator seats. These senators would have speaking and voting rights.

This bill did not pass.

Constitutional Amendment: The $10M Cap

(Bill #4406, Sept. 17, 2014)

This bill, written by Sydoriak and Yearby and sponsored by Sydoriak and King, proposed a mass survey open to all fee-paying students, in conjunction with the spring presidential/vice presidential/senatorial elections, to be completed before a fee proposal of more than $10 million could be approved.

This bill did not pass.

Support for a Colorado State University Citizen Review Board

(Resolution #4415, Dec. 3, 2014)

Sydoriak wrote this resolution that would establish a civilian oversight board to ensure efficient and professional police services in order to maintain and preserve the rights and dignity of an individual.

This resolution was passed.

Impeachment Reformation

(Bill #4411, Jan. 28, 2015)

This bill, sponsored by Sydoriak and Dedogryuk, proposed that the impeachment procedures be amended to allow minor offenses to be addressed more easily, while allowing each branch to create procedures for removal of its own officers to improve self-governance.

The bill was passed.

In Pursuit of Fiscal Responsibility (Note: This version of the bill is not the most recent version)

(Bill #4416, March 4, 2015)

Sponsored by Sydoriak, this bill allows senate to create a budget oversight committee as well as a budget proposal, giving senate the tools to give input on financial concerns.

This bill is still on the senate floor.

Concerning Veteran Recognition and Graduation Commencement

(Resolution #4418, March 11, 2015)

This resolution, sponsored by Sydoriak, would recognize graduating veterans, members of active or reserve duty for their service during commencement.

This resolution is still on the senate floor.

Taylor Albaugh

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Taylor Albaugh (Photo credit: Topher Brancaccio)

Albaugh has held her current position in the executive branch as Deputy Director of Student Services since fall 2014. As a freshman, Albaugh was a member of the Ram Leadership Team, which falls under the Outreach Department within ASCSU.

If elected, Sydoriak and Albaugh plan to pass the gavel to the Speaker Pro Tempore for control of the senate, so it can function as an individual entity, which Albaugh said they are doing to better create a separation of power.

“Right now in the ASCSU constitution bylaws, if the vice president isn’t present, then the Speaker Pro Tempore takes over,” Albaugh said. “It is already there for me to hand over the gavel if elected, and they would run everything. However, we want to pass legislation if we see it working. If we see that it is not working, I would be more than happy to step in and be the leader of senate.”

Albaugh said this person would maintain, schedule and facilitate the senate sessions, while the role of vice president would be to work as a liaison.

In her past experience with ASCSU, Albaugh has worked with program budgeting and outreach to plan student programs such as Grill the Buffs, the ASCSU Inaugural Ball and Homecoming within the Department of Student Services.

“Something that I have as an advantage is the direct contact with the students, and the genuine contact with the students,” Albaugh said. “My care has been in connections and getting to know people. Who they are, what they want.”

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(Infographic: Kate Simmons)

 

Lauren Wester

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Lauren Wester (Photo credit: Abbie Parr)

Wester has served two years in the ASCSU executive branch. She currently works as the deputy chief of staff of the organization. As a member of the executive branch, Wester can write and sponsor bills, but she cannot vote in senate. She has written or sponsored five pieces of legislation — only one of those did not pass.

“I try to sponsor legislation that is either going to be noncontroversial or legislation that is really good for the students,” Wester said. “I want to do what’s best for the students. That’s the main thing I look at when making that decision for what I’m going to support. There have been times when I’ve put my name on legislation, and then I think about it more, or I talk to more people, and I change my mind. … I’m not a senator, so I’m not the one making all the changes, so I’d rather sponsor the final draft of (the bills).”

2013 – 2014 ASCSU Job Description – Assistant Director of Outreach

(Bill #4303, Sept. 11, 2013)

This bill was written by Wester, endorsed by King and sponsored by Yearby, on behalf of her assistant director. It created an ASCSU cabinet position around a specific job description.

This bill passed.

In Support of World Water Day

(Resolution #4305, March 5, 2014)

This resolution was written in support of the United Nations Association hosting World Water Day on CSU’s campus on March 24, 2014. Wester sponsored this resolution.

This resolution passed.

Increased Information for Resources for Disabled Students

(Resolution #4309, March 26, 2014)

Wester wrote this resolution recommending that all CSU professors include information about Resources for Disabled Students in the class syllabus or otherwise mention the options available to students.

This resolution did not pass.

Request for appointment information

(Resolution #4409, Oct. 22, 2014)

Prior to this resolution, ASCSU held “no formal processes which mandate distribution of information to senators in regards to appointees prior to the Senate Session in which they may be ratified.” Coauthored by King and sponsored by Wester, the resolution required all appointees submit a short biography of qualifications to senate before they are appointed.

This resolution passed.

A Call for a New Student Poll Concerning the Proposed CSU Stadium

(Resolution #4410, Oct. 22, 2014)

Wester and King sponsored this resolution in fall 2014, before the stadium project was officially approved, that was intended to gauge student opinion of the various options available regarding the on-campus stadium.

This resolution passed.

Filipp Dedogryuk

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Filipp Dedogryuk (Photo credit: Abbie Parr)

Dedogryuk is currently serving his second term in senate. While not the author of any bills, Dedogryuk has sponsored four pieces of legislation during his time at ASCSU. Three of those have passed.

“As I senator I actually wrote five bills, (but) I didn’t pass anything — I didn’t even bring them to the senate floor,” Dedogryuk said. “I like to do my research. If I’m going to put out a bill, I want it to be good … so for three of the bills I did write, I found out there were already programs in place where there were job descriptions that already covered that. The other two, I found out that that’s not what the students want, and that’s really not going to be feasible … that’s why I’m not the original author of any of the bills. I do support other bills.”

Support for a Uniform Academic Adviser Process across Colorado State University

(Resolution #4413, Nov. 17, 2014)

The resolution, sponsored by Dedogryuk, attempted to create a program on RamWeb for students to review their advisers, regardless of their department or position at the University. The resolution was sent to President Tony Frank, the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Affairs, the Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, the deans of each college and other University officials.

This resolution passed.

In Support of the Formal Creation of ASCSU Executive Bylaws

(Resolution #4416, Dec. 10, 2014)

Because the ASCSU executive branch did not have bylaws describing the process of removing an executive officer, this resolution asked the executive branch to create such bylaws. Also the resolution, sponsored by Dedogryuk, called for the creation and retention of the Director of Health, Director of Outreach, Director of University Affairs, Director of Student Services and Director of Environmental Affairs, specifically mentioning them in the Constitution.

This resolution did not pass.

Impeachment Reformation

(Bill #4411, Jan. 28, 2015)

This bill, sponsored by Sydoriak and Dedogryuk, proposed that the impeachment procedures be amended to allow minor offenses to be addressed more easily, while allowing each branch to create procedures for removal of its own officers to improve self-governance.

This bill passed.

In Support of Campus Climate Subcommittee Proposal

(Resolution #4414, Feb. 11, 2015)

Through this resolution, sponsored by King and Dedogryuk, ASCSU members expressed their support of the the Campus Climate Subcommittee’s proposal to use Google Maps to highlight gender-inclusive restrooms and to create more gender-inclusive restrooms on campus.

This resolution passed. 

Kwon Yearby

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Kwon Yearby (Photo credit: Topher Brancaccio)

Yearby served in ASCSU from fall 2013 to November 2014, when he was impeached. He wrote or sponsored 16 bills and resolutions. Six of these pieces of legislation passed.

“I want to put out the idea and I’m not personally hurt if it doesn’t get passed or anything like that. That was my motto as a senator — put this idea out there, and we’ll see what happens.”

2013 – 2014 ASCSU Job Description – Assistant Director of Outreach

(Bill #4303, Sept. 11, 2013)

This bill, written by Wester and sponsored by Yearby, created an ASCSU cabinet position around a specific job description.

This bill passed.

Constitutional Amendment: The Appointment of Representative Officers

(Bill #4312, Nov. 20, 2013)

Written by Yearby, this constitutional amendment allowed the Cultural, Advocacy and Resource Centers of Student Diversity Programs and Services and the Adult Learner and Veteran Services to appoint no more than two representatives to ASCSU Senate. The representatives have speaking rights but are not allowed to vote.

“The purpose of our organization is to represent a student body comprised of a multitude of individuals and cultures, linked by our common denominators, yet distinguished by our unique experiences,” the bill stated.

This bill passed.

Establishing a Process for Student Initiated Budget Proposals

(Bill #4315, Dec. 11, 2013)

Coauthored by Yearby, this bill created a President’s Student Financial Advisory Council Review Committee, which reviews the CSU administration’s budget proposals. The committee invites one advisory role to a CSU administrator familiar with the budget. The ASCSU president is encouraged to present his or her decisions to the Board of Governors.

This bill passed.

The Establishment of a Excused Student Sick Day Policy

(Resolution #4307, Feb. 5, 2014)

This resolution, sponsored by Yearby, requested that full-time students receive two sick days per semester.

This resolution did not pass.

College Council Vote of Confidence

(Bill #4317, Feb. 5, 2014)

Yearby wrote this bill that gives the Speaker Pro-Tempore the ability to call for a vote of confidence on “any College Councils who have been deemed by the Senate Leaders to be non-cooperative, insufficient, … exclusionary or non-existent,” the bill stated.

The appropriate College Council should be notified of a vacancy in the Senate, and that council will have the power to fill that seat unless the Senate has stated “No Confidence” in a vote of supermajority (two-thirds). In that case, “the power of appointing Senators and Associate Senators will be given to the Senate,” the bill states. “Senate may return this power to the College Council with a vote of confidence.”

This bill did not pass.

Recommendation for the Proposed CSU Transfort Service Enhancements

(Resolution #4303, Feb. 5, 2014)

Written by Yearby, this resolution sought improvements to route 11, the creation of a Foothills connection and Veteran Teaching Hospital connection. In addition, the bill reccommended the creation of an on-campus shuttle.

This bill passed.

Recommendation for the Proposed UFFAB Fee

(Resolution #4308, Feb. 5, 2014)

This bill, written by Yearby, proposes that the ASCSU Senate not recommend any proposed fee increase of more than $.25 per credit hour to the University Facility Fee Advisory Board.

UFFAB was planning to propose a fee increase to the Student Fee Review Board of $7.98 per credit hour for the Warner College of Natural Resources addition and the future biology building.

This resolution did not pass.

State of the Association Speech

(Bill #4319, Feb. 19, 2014)

This bill, written by Yearby, proposed a speech given by the president, once a semester, detailing ASCSU’s state and recommendations.

“This speech should recommend measures to expediently fix problems facing ASCSU, maintain the purpose of the Association, and/or advocate for improvements to the Association, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, and the United States of America,” the bill stated.

This bill passed.

The Recycling Awareness Act

(Bill #4320, March 5, 2014)

Written by Yearby, this bill asked for $50,000 to repaint recycling bins to electric blue and to purchase an additional 20 recycling bins.

This bill did not pass.

Liaison College Councils

(Bill #4322, March 26, 2014)

This bill, written by Yearby, proposed that Senate be given the power to appoint senators and associate senators if a vacancy in the Senate occurs. This bill proposed that a liaison college council be formed to handle relations between ASCSU and college councils.

This bill did not pass.

Requiring the Recording of Fee Increase Proposal Open Forums

(Bill #4324, April 9, 2014)

Due to low attendance at the University Technology Fee Advisory Board and the University Facility Fee Advisory Board, this bill proposed recording video and audio of fee increase proposal forums to post online. Yearby sponsored this bill.

This bill did not pass.

Constitutional Amendment: Voting Representative Officers

(Bill #4325, April 16, 2014)

This amendment, written by Yearby, proposed that representatives hold the power to vote if they maintain the same level of involvement as senators. “Voting representatives” should be considered those who sit on an additional committee and hold two additional office hours.

This bill did not pass.

Colorado State University Police Department Complaint Procedural Reform

(Resolution #4402, Sept. 10, 2014)

This resolution, written by Sydoriak and sponsored by Yearby, established a community dialogue when filing a complaint, commendation or grievance to the CSU PD through an online form that is accessible on the main page of the CSUPD website.

This resolution passed.

Constitutional Amendment: The Diversity Bill

(Bill  #4405, Sept. 17, 2014)

Authored by Yearby and sponsored by Sydoriak, this bill sought the creation of the Students for Diversity Leadership Council to represent “underrepresented groups on campus and addressing issues of diversity and inclusion on campus.”

The council, chaired by an Executive member of ASCSU, would create two senate and four associate senate seats per office of SDPS department and Adult Learner Veteran Services Office, or a number of seats approximately 40 percent of the total academic senator and associate senator seats. These senators would have speaking and voting rights.

This bill did not pass.

Constitutional Amendment: The $10M Cap

(Bill #4406, Sept. 17, 2014)

This bill, written by Sydoriak and Yearby and sponsored by King, proposed a mass survey open to all fee-paying students, in conjunction with the spring presidential/vice presidential/senatorial elections, to be completed before a fee proposal of more than $10 million could be approved.

This bill did not pass.

Roll Call Change

(Resolution #4403, Sept. 17, 2014)

This resolution, sponsored by King and Yearby, asked that senate start at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays instead of at 6:30 p.m.

This resolution did not pass.

Clayton King

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Clayton King (Photo credit: Topher Brancaccio)

King is serving in his first term in senate. He sponsored, wrote and endorsed 14 pieces of legislation. Eight of the pieces of legislation have passed. One piece of legislation has not yet been voted on.

“I don’t think it’s really a matter of the number of bills written, per se. It’s really the essence and quality of those bills themselves.”

Colorado State University Police Department Complaint Procedural Reform

(Resolution #4402, Sept. 10, 2014)

This resolution, written by Sydoriak, endorsed by King and sponsored by Yearby, established a community dialogue when filing a complaint, commendation or grievance to the CSU PD through an online form that is accessible on the main page of the CSUPD website.

This resolution was passed.

2013 – 2014 ASCSU Job Description – Assistant Director of Outreach

(Bill #4303, Sept. 11, 2013)

This bill was written by Wester, endorsed by King and sponsored by Yearby, on behalf of her assistant director. It created an ASCSU cabinet position around a specific job description.

This bill passed.

Constitutional Amendment: The $10M Cap

(Bill #4406, Sept. 17, 2014)

This bill, written by Sydoriak and Yearby and sponsored by King, proposed a mass survey open to all fee-paying students, in conjunction with the spring presidential/vice presidential/senatorial elections, to be completed before a fee proposal of more than $10 million could be approved.

This bill did not pass.

Roll Call Change

(Resolution #4403, Sept. 17, 2014)

This resolution, sponsored by King and Yearby, asked that senate start at 7 p.m., Wednesdays instead of 6:30 p.m.

This resolution did not pass.

Legislation submission deadline

(Resolution #4404, Oct. 1, 2014)

This resolution, written by King, moved to push the deadline for submitting bills, resolutions and guest speakers for senate’s next agenda two hours back, from 10 a.m. Monday to noon Monday.

This resolution passed.

Request for appointment information

(Resolution #4409, Oct. 22, 2014)

Prior to this resolution, ASCSU held “no formal processes which mandate distribution of information to senators in regards to appointees prior to the Senate Session in which they may be ratified.” Coauthored by King and sponsored by Wester, the resolution required all appointees submit a short biography of qualifications to senate before they are appointed.

This resolution passed.

A Call for a New Student Poll Concerning the Proposed CSU Stadium

(Resolution #4410, Oct. 22, 2014)

Wester and King sponsored this resolution in fall 2014, before the stadium project was officially approved, that was intended to gauge student opinion of the various options available regarding the on-campus stadium.

The resolution passed.

Constitutional amendment: in pursuit of inclusive excellence

(Bill #4408, Oct. 29, 2014)

To represent student inclusion and diversity, the bill, endorsed by King, established an external public committee, The Inclusive Excellence Committee. Headed by the ASCSU director of diversity, the committee includes at least two senators and anyone else deemed necessary by the committee’s bylaws.

Representatives — members appointed by the Cultural, Advocacy and Resource Centers of Student Diversity Programs and Services and the Adult Learner and Veteran Services — will continue to work as outlined in the Constitutional amendment: the appointment of representative officers (Bill #4312) until bylaws for the Inclusive Excellence Committee are drafted and approved.

This bill passed.

Approval of ASCSU Board for Student Organization Funding decision of Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (SCALSA)

(Supplemental Funding Proposal #4407, Nov. 12, 2014)

The Board of Student Organization Funding may allocate up to $10,000 for any one eligible student organization. Allocations exceeding $10,000 must be ratified by senate.

This bill, sponsored by King, did not pass. SCALSA received $10,634 to be spent for their “LA Days.”

Approval of ASCSU Board for Student Organization Funding decision of Dean’s Student Leadership Council, College of Business (DSLC)

(Supplemental Funding Proposal #4404, Nov. 12, 2014)

The Board of Student Organization Funding may allocate up to $10,000, for any one eligible student organization. Allocations exceeding $10,000 must be ratified by senate.

This bill, sponsored by King, did not pass. DSLC received $13,302.96 to be spent on their “Business Days.”

In Support of the Formal Creation of ASCSU Executive Bylaws

(Resolution #4416, Dec. 10, 2014)

Because the ASCSU executive branch did not have bylaws describing the process of removing an executive officer, this resolution asked the executive branch to create such bylaws. Also, the bill called for the creation and retention of the Director of Health, Director of Outreach, Director of University Affairs, Director of Student Services and Director of Environmental Affairs, specifically mentioning them in the Constitution.

This resolution, sponsored by King, did not pass.

Lowering the Campaign Spending Limit

(Bill #4412, Jan. 28, 2015)

In spring 2014, presidential campaign finance limits were raised to counteract the closure of the LSC Plaza. This bill, endorsed by King, limited personal spending by presidential and vice presidential campaigns to $1,000 and limited the total campaign to $1,500. In-kind donations cannot exceed $50 per donor.

This bill passed.

In Support of Campus Climate Subcommittee Proposal

(Resolution #4414, Feb. 11, 2015)

Through this resolution, sponsored by King and Dedogryuk, ASCSU members expressed their support of the the Campus Climate Subcommittee’s proposal to use Google Maps to highlight gender-inclusive restrooms and to create more gender-inclusive restrooms on campus.

This resolution passed.

A Resolution Supporting the Extension of Study Abroad Opportunities in Israel

(Resolution #4420, March 25, 2015)

“The Associated Students of Colorado State University, formally support expanding study abroad opportunities in Israel for students across all focus areas, graduate and undergraduate,” the resolution stated.

This resolution, sponsored by King, has not been voted on yet.

Collegian Reporters Christina Vessa, Ellie Mulder, Hannah Ditzenberger and Lawrence Lam can be reached at news@collegian.com or on twitter @chrissyvessa, @lemarie, @h_ditzenberger and @LawrenceKLam.

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