The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
The Importance of Supporting Engineering Education
The Importance of Supporting Engineering Education
February 20, 2024

In today's era of information technology, engineering plays the role of a vanguard, trying to optimize processes and develop new products, making...

ASCSU Supreme Court resolves conflicts at CSU

Through recent elections, conflicts and legislative initiatives, students may be familiar with the executive and legislative side of Associated Students of Colorado State University. However, the judicial branch of ASCSU also contributes to student life at CSU. 

“We have an active role on the campus,” said Jake Moore, an associate justice. “With ASCSU, sometime it stays internal with student affairs, but I feel that the Supreme Court has an awesome dynamic of getting to work with (a wide variety of people).”

Ad

Associated Students of Colorado State University Supreme Court members, (left to right) court liaison Connor Ferguson, associate justice Allie Salz, associate justice Jake Moore, deputy chief justice Nick Dannemiller, chief justice Rioux Jordan, associate justice Jacob Stein, associate justice Celine Wolff, and sergeant at arms Duane Hansen.
Associated Students of Colorado State University Supreme Court members, (left to right) court liaison Connor Ferguson, associate justice Allie Salz, associate justice Jake Moore, deputy chief justice Nick Dannemiller, chief justice Rioux Jordan, associate justice Jacob Stein, associate justice Celine Wolff, and sergeant at arms Duane Hansen. (Photo credit: Topher Brancaccio)

According to Chief Justice Rioux Jordan, the judicial branch has four main responsibilities: to interpret and uphold the ASCSU constitution, to represent students’ voices at conduct appeal and pre-admittance meetings, to serve on the All University Hearing Board and to conduct investigations within ASCSU. 

“Two faculty or staff members and two justices … discuss the incident, the case report, what happened and  especially the sanctions that were handed down to decide if this was fair, if it was the right decision,” Jordan said about their representation at conduct appeal meetings. “Currently, you’ve got prescribed conduct in the conduct code that students are expected to abide by. If (the University) finds that you’re alleged to have violated this, you’re called over to the conduct office.”

Five associate justices, one sergeant at arms, one court liaison, one deputy chief justice and one chief justice serve on the court. Justices are selected through an application process and are appointed by the president, Jordan said.

“The chief justice and the president do the interviews (for justices) together, but the president is the person who appoints,” Jordan said. “After that, senate has to ratify the decision. Every branch gets involved.”

Jordan first got involved with ASCSU in 2013, and said he was unaware of what the judicial branch did. Now, he loves what he does.

“When I get in a position that I really love, when I do something that I really love, I don’t feel like I’m spending any time on it,” Jordan said. “I’ve literally sat down and written hundreds and hundreds of papers trying to improve our policy here when I probably should have been writing a five page paper. But it doesn’t feel like work. It’s something I really enjoy and something I’m good at.”

Moore, a freshman economics major, was involved with student government in high school. He considers serving with ASCSU a greater extension of his past.

Associated Students of Colorado State University Supreme Court members (left to right) deputy chief justice Nick Dannemiller, court liaison Connor Ferguson, associate justice Celine Wolff, chief justice Rioux Jordan, sergeant at arms Duane Hansen, associate justice Allie Salz, associate justice Jake Moore, and associate justice Jacob Stein.
Associated Students of Colorado State University Supreme Court members (left to right) deputy chief justice Nick Dannemiller, court liaison Connor Ferguson, associate justice Celine Wolff, chief justice Rioux Jordan, sergeant at arms Duane Hansen, associate justice Allie Salz, associate justice Jake Moore, and associate justice Jacob Stein. (Photo credit: Topher Brancaccio)

Court liasion Connor Ferguson said that, while it is hard to impose sanctions on students, he values helping them get back into the system.

“I always struggle with the idea that I’m the bad guy or the negative face,” Ferguson said. “I don’t want to be that. I’m just trying to support them, so that it doesn’t go on a permanent record.”

Ad

Whether at a global, national or CSU level, integrity is important to Jordan. This inspires his work.

“The idea of justice is hugely important,” Jordan said. “It’s how people to respond to allegations and to the system we live in. Having a representative in that process, a person that can sympathize, is hugely important – somebody who can look through and understand the situation.”

Collegian Diversity Beat Reporter Hannah Ditzenberger can be reached at news@collegian.com or on Twitter at @h_ditzenberger.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Hey, thanks for visiting Collegian.com!
We’d like to ask you to please disable your ad blocker when looking at our site — advertising revenue directly supports our student journalists and allows us to bring you more content like this.

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *