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10 Easter facts you didn’t know about

Vajicka1
(photo credit: getty images)

Easter is the beloved holiday that graces the world with it’s presence every spring. If you practice Christianity, the holiday symbolizes the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. However, if you tend to be more on the secular side of spirituality, Easter still may symbolize a celebration of spring and family. Which every side you find yourself sitting on, chances are you have many of the same traditions. However, wouldn’t it be nice to understand where some of these traditions came from? Bustle agrees, which is why their recent article uncovers some Easter facts you may not know about.

Here’s some Easter trivia:

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  1. Giving people Easter eggs is a tradition that dates back way earlier than East itself. Eggs have carried the symbolic meaning of new life since even before paganism was popular. However, since Easter relates to the resurrection of Jesus Christ, it only makes sense to incorporate the thousands of years old traditions of eggs with the holiday.
  2. Americans buy more than 700 million peeps during the holiday. Yes, you read that right. Those marshmallow, pastel-colored, chick shaped candies are a hot item around this time of year. Productions have even gone as far as creating peep-flavored milk this year.
  3. Half of the United States agrees that chickens shouldn’t be dyed for Easter. As cruel as it may sound, some people in the country still believe that dying chickens for Easter is festive. Even though non-toxic dye has been created recently, the practice still seems a bit inhumane and makes people and the chicks just plain sad.
  4. Easter was named for the Anglo-Saxon goddess “Eostre.” This goddess is especially known for symbolizing spring and everything it includes. She was praised in celebrations of fertility, and also is believed to have close ties with the traditional Easter symbols of rabbits and eggs.
  5. The white lily is the official flower of Easter. Even though most people these days don’t know that holidays have official flowers, why not start learning a few now? The white lily represents grace and purity. Churches decorate their halls and sanctuaries with the precious flowers during Easter too.
  6. President Rutherford B. Hayes created the annual White House “Egg Roll.” This tradition is still being done today. This year, the First Family will be celebrating the 138th “Egg Roll.” About 35,000 people are expected to attend.

For the final four Easter facts, click here.

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