The Non-Traditional: Finding your career path

Ashley Haberman

Shayla Monteiro is a Senior at CSU double majoring in Social Work and Women's Studies. She is a student embassador working at the front desk in the career center. Photo By Ryan Arb
Shayla Monteiro is a Senior at CSU double majoring in Social Work and Women’s Studies. She is a student embassador working at the front desk in the career center. Photo By Ryan Arb

We all remember those childhood dreams and ideas of what we wanted to be when we grew up – scientists, astronauts, actors/actresses, etcetera. At the time, we really believed that’s what we were going to be. But as time goes on and childhood awkwardly grows into those teenage years, they often change as society and authority cloud our dreams with practical reality.

Since my adolescent years, filling journals full of poetry and non-fiction, taking weird creative photos and creating abstract collages was the passion that led me to my current journalism school career – and it took me over a decade to get here. Receiving my license in massage therapy was my first career endeavor but, as time went on, proved to not be my true calling.

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Now, having finally followed my life-long dream and being able to take the steps to be close to the end of my first bachelor’s degree in journalism, I have dabbled with doubts of what I want to do with my degree. Changing the world and making a difference in the global injustice and wrong-doings has been my sought-after path in journalism. But the more I learn, gain knowledge and see how the trying work of journalism has yet to make a difference in the current refugee crisis and bloodshed of the innocent women and children of war around the world, I question the possibility of my single person ability to do anything to bring peace and justice.

While having a beer with my best friend at the end of yet another long day of discovering more of the world’s incurable tendency towards injustice, casualties of war, racism and discrimination, we came to the more light-hearted conclusion that maybe making a difference would be more possible if I pursued my minor in ethnic studies as a masters and future PhD to educate and facilitate awareness in the ways my professors do for me now.

All of this said, the process of figuring out your path, the up’s and down’s it may bring, and the uncertainty of it all are normal and expected courses in reaching success and contentment with your career and place in the world. Taking extra time or getting more than one degree should never be questioned or looked down upon. Rather, this process adds to the knowledge and diversity in the world and can bring about more of the change and awareness that is needed for the future.

Collegian writer Ashley Haberman can be reached at blogs@collegian.com