Presidential Nominee Donald Trump rallies in Loveland Monday night

Stuart Smith

Monday night, the Budweiser Event Center in Loveland filled up with thousands of citizens of Northern Colorado all hoping to get a glimpse of the night’s special guest: Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.

Along with the presidential nominee, several members of the Trump campaign have also made stops in Colorado. His daughter Ivanka and son Donald Trump Jr. made stops in Fort Collins and Grand Junction, respectively, and the Republican Vice Presidential candidate Mike Pence held a town hall meeting in Colorado Springs.

Ad

Trump has made a big presence in Colorado due to the close polling between himself and Hillary Clinton.

[new_royalslider id=”533″]

 

While many of the attendees were supporters of Trump, there were also several groups protesting his arrival. The venue established an area in a parking lot outside for them to be able to let their voices be heard safely.

“(I) disagree with just about everything he says… it’s just hateful,” said Maisy Montague, a junior at Mountain Vista High School protesting the rally. “All he does is work to make himself richer, and he doesn’t care about anybody else.”

On being asked about Trump’s narrative that illegal immigrants are taking jobs away from legal citizens, she responded that “they are taking the jobs that American citizens wouldn’t do.”

Despite the protests, fans of Trump were excited for the rally, and were enthusiastic about a candidate that they believe shares their values.

“(Trump) is a better candidate for our military, [and] we can trust him,” said Jim Whitlow. “He’s a businessman, and we need someone in office who’s a businessman, and will get us out of this $20 trillion debt we’re in.”

Donald Trump came out shortly after 6 p.m. to thunderous applause, and immediately started his speech by saying that he would win Colorado, and that everyone needed to send in their ballots before November 8, election day.

Once the introductory part of his speech was over, he started talking about taking on ISIS, saying “you don’t talk, you do it,” and that General George Patton is “right now spinning in his grave.”

Ad

After that, he spoke about Colorado-specific issues, such as hunting and mining.

In regards to the Second Amendment, Trump said that it is “under seige,” and that “we have to preserve and protect it.”

Then, he started attacking Hillary Clinton’s energy plans, saying that it would take away, “hundreds of millions of jobs in terms of dollars,” and that his plan would “put our miners back to work.”

A big part of Trump’s speech was devoted to addressing his tax plan, and his knowledge of the tax code.

“(My plan will be the) largest tax cut since Ronald Reagan, and the largest regulatory reform in American history,” Trump said.

He claimed his tax plan would bring taxes for companies down from 35 percent to 15 percent, for middle income citizens to 12.5 percent, and 0 percent for “people that aren’t doing so well.”

Then, Trump spoke about infrastructure, saying that with what the tax rates are now, one would expect the country to be “tippy top.”

“But, it’s the opposite of tippy top,” Trump said “(There are) potholes, airports are horrible, like third-world countries, (there are) bridges that are half falling down.”

Trump said that he “understands the tax laws better than anyone, which is why [he] is the one that can fix them,” that he is “going to do things to make our taxes more fair, and make our whole country a more fair place to live.”

Trump also addressed the article that the New York Times published this past weekend about his allegedly having lost nearly a billion dollars in 1995. He said that it was during “one of the most brutal economic downturns in our country’s history,” and that “the conditions facing [the] nation’s real estate developers were almost as bad as in 1929,” when the Great Depression began. But now, he explained, his company “has never been stronger, has never been better.”

After, he delved into a detailed explanation of his career as a businessman, explaining that tough times were when he “performed (his) best, and enjoyed it, in a certain way, the most,” and that he “enjoyed waking up, every single morning, to go to battle… taking out the financial establishment, dealing with the financial establishment.”

Then Trump spoke about the state of the country’s race relations, saying that “this is not the America that was handed down to us, and it’s not the America we want given to our children.” He blamed the current climate on the political establishment, saying that “it must go.”

He finished the rally with a call to action, saying that “together, we will make America wealthy again . . . we will make America strong again, we will make America safe again, and we will make America great again.”

Trump will next be making a national appearance on Oct. 9, in the second of three presidential election debates. His running mate, Mike Pence, will be debating Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Tim Kaine on Tuesday, Oct. 4.