The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
How to Increase eCommerce Sales with SEO
How to Increase eCommerce Sales with SEO
February 28, 2024

With the development of the online shopping market, SEO has become a crucial factor in driving targeted traffic and increasing sales. Effective...

Students For Life discusses “Why We Don’t Need Planned Parenthood”

Editor’s Note: A previous version of this article quoted Students for Life President Emily Faukner who claimed that the  Supreme Court of the United States found that Planned Parenthood clinics had been harvesting and selling baby organs. Her claim has since been revised to say that the House of Representatives made this finding after Faulkner claimed she misspoke.


On Wednesday April 27, Students for Life presented in the Lory Student Center plaza on why Planned Parenthood is unnecessary.

Ad

Junior biology major Emily Faulkner is the president and one of the founders of Students for Life, an on-campus pro-life organization. She said that the purpose of the presentation and booth was demonstrate that the services Planned Parenthood provides can be absorbed by other health groups.

“The basis of it is that Planned Parenthood has about seven services that they offer, Federally Qualified Health Centers have about 20,” Faulkner said. “Federally Qualified Health Centers provide a lot more services and better quality services than Planned Parenthood.”

The presentation was not an attack of all abortion clinics, but of Planned Parenthood specifically. Although the group is pro-life, Faulkner said that there are other places women can go for abortion services if Planned Parenthood was successfully shut down.

Faulker claimed that the U.S. House of Representatives found that one in five Planned Parenthood locations had been “illegally harvesting baby organs and selling them.”

She argued that with the recent findings about Planned Parenthood, the group is not helping women the way they advertise they are.

“I think that Planned Parenthood is doing a lot behind closed doors that people don’t know about,” Faulkner said. “They’ve been exposed for sure, but it’s time to bring them down.”

Freshman human development and family studies major Elizabeth Luttrell was at the event working as a volunteer to talk to people as they passed by. This event was her first time volunteering with the group.

“I’m passionate about women in all stages of their life, and I want them to have the best life possible,” Faulkner said. “And that includes unborn women as well.”

The group had several volunteers passing out fliers to passer-bys and talking to students about how unnecessary Planned Parenthood is.

Ad

Sophomore equine science major Charleen Lamphere passed by and had a discussion with the group.

“You know, I like that people can come out here and state their beliefs,” Lamphere said. “But I know Planned Parenthood really helped me when I needed an IUD for safety reasons and it was a third of the price of anywhere else I could find and I didn’t have health insurance.”

Collegian Reporter Tatiana Talesnick-Parafiniuk can be reached online at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @tatianasophiapt.

View Comments (3)
More to Discover

Hey, thanks for visiting Collegian.com!
We’d like to ask you to please disable your ad blocker when looking at our site — advertising revenue directly supports our student journalists and allows us to bring you more content like this.

Comments (3)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  • M

    Menachem MevashirJan 18, 2017 at 12:59 pm

    http://equalrightsinstitute.com/staff/josh-brahm/
    https://collegian.com/2017/01/students-for-life-group-files-free-speech-lawsuit-against-csu/
    http://www.adfmedia.org/files/StudentsForLifeCSUcomplaint.pdf
    http://denver.cbslocal.com/2017/01/18/csu-student-organization-says-university-denied-funding-for-pro-life-speaker/
    http://www.denverpost.com/2017/01/18/pro-life-student-group-sues-csu-campus-speaker-grant/

    I think the pro-life position could be bolstered with the following insights:

    1. You should call yourselves both pro-life and pro-choice, since G+D asks us to Choose Life.

    2. I think you should recognize that when a woman conceives a child out of wedlock (for whatever reason) she is under a biblical curse. G+D knows that it is very risky for a woman to get pregnant and have a child. She requires the assurance of marriage to safeguard her and the baby. So when a woman becomes pregnant outside of marriage, we need to understand and accept that her default position is going to be to abort the child. This would help the pro-life movement mobilize resources to promote adoption and also not to be so judgmental of women who are tempted to abort in these circumstances.

    3. A commonly used argument by pro-abortion advocates is that in Exodus 22 the bible seems not to deem abortion a capital crime. (This is according to the most liberal interpretations.) This is misleading since the case in question is an accidental miscarriage not a deliberate abortion. Also even in this most liberal perspective on this case the bible fines the perpetrator whose actions caused the miscarriage. No one should pretend this passage endorses deliberate premeditated abortion! Indeed it seems that in the biblical view, it is almost inconceivable for any woman to want to abort her own child!No one should pretend this passage endorses deliberate premeditated abortion! Indeed it seems that in the biblical view, it is almost inconceivable for any woman to want to abort her own child!

    Exodus 21:22-25 New International Version (NIV)
    22 “If people are fighting and hit a pregnant woman and she gives birth prematurely[a] but there is no serious injury, the offender must be fined whatever the woman’s husband demands and the court allows. 23 But if there is serious injury, you are to take life for life, 24 eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot, 25 burn for burn, wound for wound, bruise for bruise.
    Footnotes:
    a. Exodus 21:22 Or she has a miscarriage

    Thanks for letting me express these views, and thanks for your good work!

    I lived in Israel for 18 years as an Orthodox Jew before my conversion to Christianity.

    Menachem Mevashir – http://yahuwallah.blogspot.com/

    PS This is a superb book (written by a pro-life Catholic professor in Englanbd) that explores every aspect of this problem:

    The Soul of the Embryo: An Enquiry into the Status of the Human Embryo in the Christian Tradition Dec 23, 2004 by David Albert Jones
    https://www.amazon.com/Soul-Embryo-Enquiry-Christian-Tradition/dp/0826462960/ref=la_B001HCX30Y_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1484767726&sr=1-2
    ________________________________________
    We are delighted to announce that this book has been short listed for the prestigious Michael Ramsey prize for the best in theological writing. For more information please visit: http://www.michaelramseyprize.org.uk A radical examination of the Christian tradition relating to the human embryo and how this relates to the debate today.In recent years, the moral status of the human embryo has come to the fore as a vital issue for a range of contemporary ethical debates: concerning the over-production, freezing and discarding of embryos in IVF; concerning the use of ‘spare’ embryos for scientific experimentation; and finally, concerning the prospect of producing clone embryos. These debates have involved not only general philosophical arguments, but also specifically religious arguments. Many participants have attempted to find precedent from the Christian tradition for the positions they wish to defend.It is therefore extraordinary that until The Soul of the Embryo there has been no significant work on the history of Christian reflection on the human embryo. Here, David Albert Jones seeks to tell the story of this unfolding tradition – a story that encompasses many different medical, moral, philosophical and theological themes. He starts by examining the understanding of the embryo in the Hebrew Scritpures, then moves through early Christianity and the Middle Ages to the Reformation and beyond. Finally, Albert Jones considers the application of this developed tradition to contemporary situation and questions which contemporary Christian view or views are best regarded as authentic developments of the tradition and which should be regarded as alien to the tradition.
    ________________________________________
    Editorial Reviews
    Review
    “…a fascinating historical study of what people have thought, from the earliest biblical times, about the human soul before birth”. — The Daily Telegraph

    “The book presents a scholarly yet accessible interdisciplinary analysis of the tradition of the Christian thinking on the status of the embryo, and a careful, powerful and fair theological and philosophical case against the destruction of the human embryo from conception. It is to be highly recommended.” –Tablet, John Keown, 5th February 2005

    ‘A scholarly contribution to the history, background and detail of the human embryo in medical, theological and moral terms. It deserves to be studied both in itself and in the important reminder of our essential human being, where we come from, what we are and what significance we have and share in this world and in eternity’
    (E David Cook Theology)

    ‘Archbishop Rowan Williams describes the book as ‘a valuable contribution to a mist important debate’. Quite so. It is to be highly recommended.’ – Adapted from a Tablet review by John Keown, Rose Kennedy Professor of Christian Ethics at Georgetown University, in Triple Helix

    ‘In providing a systematic historical account of Christian and other approaches to the embryo, David Jones offers some fascinating material for reflection.’
    ‘…this book provides valuable material for a principled rather than merely pragmatic reflection on our attitude to this most vulnerable phase of life.’ (Andrew Fox, Epworth Review, April 2006)

    ‘The scope of his work is impressive and the topic extraordinarily significant, He deals carefully with a wide variety of primary sources, and he reflects insightfully on these sources and their theological and ethical implications…[an] important book.’
    ~ Michael J. Gorman, Studies in Christian Ethics, Vol 19, No. 1

    “David Jones (Professor of Bioethics, St Mary’s College, Twickenham) has provided a scholarly and insightful contribution to this field, with its complex intersection of theology, philosophy, ethics, jurisprudence and science.” – Reformed Theological Review

    ‘A scholarly contribution to the history, background and detail of the human embryo in medical, theological and moral terms. It deserves to be studied both in itself and in the important reminder of our essential human being, where we come from, what we are and what significance we have and share in this world and in eternity’
    (Sanford Lakoff Theology)

    ‘In providing a systematic historical account of Christian and other approaches to the embryo, David Jones offers some fascinating material for reflection.’
    ‘…this book provides valuable material for a principled rather than merely pragmatic reflection on our attitude to this most vulnerable phase of life.’ (Andrew Fox, Epworth Review, April 2006)

    ‘The scope of his work is impressive and the topic extraordinarily significant, He deals carefully with a wide variety of primary sources, and he reflects insightfully on these sources and their theological and ethical implications…[an] important book.’
    ~ Michael J. Gorman, Studies in Christian Ethics, Vol 19, No. 1

    “David Jones (Professor of Bioethics, St Mary’s College, Twickenham) has provided a scholarly and insightful contribution to this field, with its complex intersection of theology, philosophy, ethics, jurisprudence and science.” – Reformed Theological Review

    ‘A scholarly contribution to the history, background and detail of the human embryo in medical, theological and moral terms. It deserves to be studied both in itself and in the important reminder of our essential human being, where we come from, what we are and what significance we have and share in this world and in eternity’
    (Sanford Lakoff Theology)

    ‘In providing a systematic historical account of Christian and other approaches to the embryo, David Jones offers some fascinating material for reflection.’
    ‘…this book provides valuable material for a principled rather than merely pragmatic reflection on our attitude to this most vulnerable phase of life.’ (Sanford Lakoff) ________________________________________
    From the Publisher
    Few topics evoke such strong reactions among Christians and non-Christians alike as the current state of scientific experimentation on human embryos. The subject bristles with theological, philosophical and medical difficulties.
    Recent media coverage, showing 12-week old foetuses which it is claimed are able to feel pain and similar sensations, tends to be sensational and emotive in approach.
    However, The Soul of the Embryo by David Jones, is a thoughtful and dispassionate view of the way in which, from the Old Testament onwards, the status of the embryo has been viewed by religious thinkers in the Judeo-Christian tradition.
    Jones applies such insights to the contemporary situation, outlining the ways in which our current understanding and practice is either rooted in this tradition, or deviates from it.
    The Soul of the Embryo is an important work, which covers ground never previously explored in such depth and thoroughness.
    ________________________________________
    From the Author
    This enquiry is specifically concerned a Christian story. It seeks to determine what a critical engagement with legal, scientific, philosophical, ethical and theological aspects of this tradition has to teach us about the human embryo. Nevertheless, there is much of interest here for those who are not adherents of Christianity. The recognition that human life is a gift from God, that human beings possess a soul that is given by God is common to Jews, Muslims and many other religious traditions. Even those who are not practising members of any faith community may acknowledge a spiritual dimension to life. What is described here in the concrete and sometimes obscure theological language of Christianity relates fundamentally to the mystery of the existence of each human life. It is urged that our existence is a mystery, not only a puzzle to solve or an ambiguity to resolve. If so, then the origin of each human being should also be recognised as a profound aspect of our common humanity. The human embryo, even while it consists of a single cell or just a few cells, is nothing less than the hidden or enfolded beginning of a new human being.
    ________________________________________
    About the Author
    David Albert Jones is Director of the Anscombe Bioethics Centre, Oxford, and Visiting Professor of Bioethics at St Mary’s University College, London, UK.
    http://www.bioethics.org.uk/detail/about_us/staff_and_fellows/david-jones
    http://www.stmarys.ac.uk/education-theology-and-leadership/staff/david-jones.htm

    Reply
  • D

    DanielApr 29, 2016 at 12:01 am

    “Because of recent discoveries, the Supreme Court just ruled that one in five Planned Parenthoods have been illegally harvesting baby organs and selling them.”

    Yea what is she talking about? That video has already gone to court in a suuuper Republican county (Montgomery, Texas) and PP was innocent of any charges. In fact, the people who created the video were charged with crimes… Yet people still reference this video (I’m assuming) to support this PP smear job.

    Also, late term abortion is already illegal in this country..

    Reply
  • G

    GraceApr 28, 2016 at 7:10 pm

    “Because of recent discoveries, the Supreme Court just ruled that one in five Planned Parenthoods have been illegally harvesting baby organs and selling them.”

    What recent discoveries and what Supreme Court ruling? I tried to google this and couldn’t find much but the CMP video controversy. Is that what Faulkner is referring to, or something else?

    Reply