New Belgium makes changes to signature beer recipes

Megan Fischer

Two of New Belgium’s longest-running beers, Abbey Belgian Style Dubbel and Trippel Belgian Style Ale, will have a different taste come September.

Both beers started as home-brew recipes more than 25 years ago.

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Changes in the beer making process have influenced two of New Belgium's beers. Abbey Belgian Style Dubbel and Trippel Belgian Style Ale now have new recipes, but both can be found on shelves for a limited time. (Photo Credit: Megan Fischer)
Changes in the beer-making process have influenced two of New Belgium’s beers. Abbey Belgian Style Dubbel and Trippel Belgian Style Ale now have new recipes, but both can be found on shelves for a limited time. (Photo Credit: Megan Fischer)

“You don’t change something like that lightly, but you want to be innovative,” said Bryan Simpson, New Belgium spokesperson. “We’ve been able to take some chances, play and have fun with it.”

Changes in hop and malt manufacturing instigated the new recipes, according to a press release. This allows more of the flavors to come through in the taste of the beer.

“We are finding they are more true to Belgium style,” Simpson said. “We are enjoying it so much.”

Simpson said the introduction of a new yeast strain will allow the taste of the malts to be more apparent.

The new recipes include the incorporation of Pilsener malt and one additional hop, Hallertau Mittelfrüh, in the Trippel recipe to create an herbal and spicy flavor. Abbey has eight different malts including caramel, Munich, chocolate and now oats. These additions add rich tones of chocolate and dark caramel with hints of dried cherries, burnt sugar and figs.

“As an American craft brewer founded on Belgian tradition, we have a deep respect for our history and our roots,” said specialty brand manager Lauren Salazar in the release. “And of course, there’s a ‘New’ in our name for a reason. As brewers of craft beer, we need to embrace growth and change and continue to push ourselves to make the best beers possible.”

Beer drinkers can find both old and new versions of the beers on the shelves, and they can tell differences by looking at the expiration dates on the beers. Any Trippel with a best by date of April 17, 2016, and any Abbey with a best by date of June 19, 2016 or later are the new versions of the beers.

Simpson said the recipe changes reflect the company’s goals to be innovative, while maintaining some very important traditions the company holds.

“We’re usually at our best when we can take old world traditions and improve them with new world advancements,” Simpson said.

Collegian Reporter Megan Fischer can be reached at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @MegFischer04.

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