The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Print Edition
Letter to the editor submissions
Have a strong opinion about something happening on campus or in Fort Collins? Want to respond to an article written on The Collegian? Write a Letter to the Editor by following the guidelines here.
Follow Us on Twitter
When Should You Start Writing Your College Essay? 
When Should You Start Writing Your College Essay? 
May 28, 2024

Let's be frank: there's never an ideal moment to craft college essays. At best, there are times that are somewhat less unfavorable. Why is...

Giving blood sure takes a lot out of you: César Chàvez Blood Drive held on campus

Video by Brynn Carman, CTV News 

Ad

Inside the Bonfils Blood Center bus with Reporter Jessie Trudell

It was approximately 2:15 in the afternoon Thursday as my life flashed before my eyes, my vision became hazy and I dropped to the ground.

CSU Allumni Micheal Sieg donates blood at the Bonfils blood drive right outside the Forestry Building. The Bonfils blood center often brings out their portable donation center to CSU so that students and faculty can donate blood.
CSU Allumni Micheal Sieg donates blood at the Bonfils blood drive right outside the Forestry Building. The Bonfils blood center often brings out their portable donation center to CSU so that students and faculty can donate blood. (Photo credit: Brynn Carman)

Just kidding – but I sure got close.

Like many other people, I do not particularly enjoy needles. They do not especially appeal to me. However, the fact that every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs a transfusion of blood convinced me to get past my fears and donate some liquid gold.

So there it was: my opportunity to give back, only a few steps and a needle away.

“It smells so sterile in here,” I said aloud as I entered the donation-site-on-wheels: the Bonfils Blood Center bus, stationed right outside Colorado State University‘s Clark A building.

The nurse filling out my information asked, “well, would you rather have it smell not sterile?”

Touché.

The nurse finished registering me as a blood donor, and asked questions pertaining to a brief history of my health. I was then declared eligible to donate.

I think the nurses are trained to smell fear, because before I even sat down at the blood-giving station, they had a bottle of juice in my hand and were instructing me to breathe deeply. Once I got comfortable, they took the donation. The only pain I felt was a slight sting in my arm when they inserted and removed the needle. However, I think a minor irritation such as the needle can be easily conquered when lives of others depend on it.  Following my donation, I was free to go after a brief recovery period.

Ad

I walked out of that bus feeling like a better person, especially because I learned that one whole blood donation can help improve and save the lives of up to three patients. Bonfils Blood Center serves as the necessary middleman between donors and the people that need the donations the most.

“The most rewarding part for me is the fact that giving blood saves lives every day,” said Jeff Dillavou, CDR for Bonfils Blood Center.

Bonfils Blood Center has been accommodating the blood needs of the Rocky Mountains since early 1943. Given that blood cannot be synthetically made, Bonfils Blood Center relies solely on the donations of healthy and willing volunteers. These donations are then used to save the lives of people that experience significant blood loss through trauma or other circumstances.

“Lives depend on donated blood,” Dillavou said. “Decide to save a life.”

Collegian Reporter Jessie Trudell can be reached at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @JessieTrudell.

Leave a Comment
More to Discover

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *