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Colorado State Bookstore’s annual duct tape competition winners announced

Senior mechanical engineering major, Crystal Whelan, won first place in the CSU Bookstore's annual Duct Tape competition with her duct tape sculpture of a peacock. (Photo credit: Stephanie Mason)
Senior mechanical engineering major, Crystal Whelan, won first place in the CSU Bookstore’s annual Duct Tape competition with her duct tape sculpture of a peacock. (Photo credit: Stephanie Mason)

The downstairs Lory Student Center Bookstore displayed diverse and colorful works of duct tape art on Thursday for the Annual Bookstore Duct Tape Contest  judging.

“We were excited and ecstatic and would like to thank everyone who participated,” said Jim Armstrong, the bookstore employee who announced the winners. “This is truly unique and … it just keeps getting better every year.”

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Crystal Whelan, a senior mechanical engineering major, won the competition with a duct tape peacock. Whelan won a $250 gift card. There were gift certificate prizes for the first through fourth place winners.

Whelan also won the competition two years ago with a duct tape eagle. She observed that there were more entries than the previous competition.

“They’re awesome,” said Ken McGee, senior art student and competition judge. “Definitely a lot of work.”

According to Whelan, it took her four rolls of tape and six hours to make the peacock, which she started the night before the entry date.

“They are really creative,” Whelan said.

According to McGee, the projects were judged on originality and workmanship. The three judges did not know the entrants to the competition.

“So, how unique the design is and how much work is put into the design,” McGee said. “I have been more looking at how much texture is in it, what the structure is, if they were deliberate in their color choices, patterns and stuff.”

Other entries included a bike built to scale, a lighthouse, Ram armor, Cam the Ram, a dress and a biohazard suit.

According to McGee, there are discount sales on duct tape to ensure that being able to enter is not too expensive for entrants.

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“They have been doing it for a few years now,” McGee said. “I think it is just a fun thing people can do to make something cool.”

Collegian Reporter Stephanie Mason can be reached at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @StephersMason

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