Horticulture club holding spring plant sale

As CSU students are approaching graduation this year, many are faced with a decision of what to do once they reach the “real world.” Some students, such as Mark Frey, a senior environmental horticulture major and president of the Horticulture Club, are lucky enough to know where their passion lies.

Senior horitculture major Mark Frey ties tomato plants in preparation for the Horticulture Club plant sale Wednesday. The Horticulture Club will be selling plants at the flea market today to raise money for the club to compete at MACHS, Mid America Collegiate Horicultre Society competition.
Senior horitculture major Mark Frey ties tomato plants in preparation for the Horticulture Club plant sale Wednesday. The Horticulture Club will be selling plants at the flea market today to raise money for the club to compete at MACHS, Mid America Collegiate Horicultre Society competition.

This Thursday and Friday, CSU’s Horticulture Club will provide an opportunity to purchase a home-grown Mother’s day gift, and has also created a way for the students of the club to do what they love: grow things. CSU’s Horticulture Club spring plant sale will take place on Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the LSC Flea Market and Friday in the PERC building by Academic Village.

The plants that will be available range from perennial flowers such as pansies, violas, and gazanias, to succulents such as sedums, aloes, and cacti. They will also be selling various house plants, tomatoes, mint and thyme. Plant prices range from two to five dollars, with planters also available at $10 apiece, Frey said.

The students will be selling plants they first started growing in February and March, and have caring for ever since, Frey said.

Frey grew up in a mountainous, rural region and was very interested in all things outdoorsy. After taking a greenhouse management class in high school, he said knew he wanted to major in horticulture, and maybe even start his own botanic garden.

“Living in cities, a lot of people won’t be able to enjoy (nature) this day in age. That’s why I thought I could start a garden and bring it to a community so people have this resource to get in tune with nature,” Frey said.

Frey, who will be working at a nursery this summer, explains that a botanic garden is a “living museum,” which needs national accreditation. Not only does he enjoy being involved in the plant growth, Frey believes these gardens are a crucial part of society.

“If we run into problems with our current food system we can be able to re-breed and kind continue the life cycle of plants,” Frey said.

Ariel Piper, senior environmental horticulture major and the current club secretary, said that the club is trying to raise money with the plant sale for various trips, such as the Mid America Collegiate Horticulture Society competition in the fall.

Piper said the competition, which is in Wisconsin, is against horticulture schools across the nation and consists of tests on general knowledge, plant identification, as well as fruit and vegetable judging.

“Our motto on the back of our T-shirts is: life is a garden, dig it,” Piper said.

Collegian Writer Cailley Biagini can be reached at news@collegian.com.