How to shed those extra winter layers

With CSU’s five-week winter break comes a lot of sitting on the couch eating delicious food that you didn’t have to make for yourself, devouring frosted holiday cookies and not enough physical activities.

“The hardest thing is that (students) went home and sat with family and ate mom’s cooking,” said Ally Mattson, junior health and exercise science major. “It’s hard

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Sean Nielson blocks a shot made by Emma Hart during a pickup basketball game on the IM fields Sunday afternoon. As the weather warms up, people are heading outside to stay in shape.
Sean Nielson blocks a shot made by Emma Hart during a pickup basketball game on the IM fields Sunday afternoon. As the weather warms up, people are heading outside to stay in shape.

to get active again and it’s easy to use the excuse of school, work or being too busy.”

The holidays invite many sweets in large quantities. Now that break is over, Mattson stresses that sweets are a bad thing, and curbing your appetite for sweets will be a big help.

Its not a secret that processed foods are also bad for you, and fresh food –– especially fruits and vegetables –– are good for you, so Mattson suggests that eating such foods and adding some veggies into your diet will be a major help with getting back in shape.

“What most college kids don’t want to hear is to cut out sugary drinks,” Mattson said. “Instead of drinking soda and juices, drink water instead and you’ll see a difference quickly.”

Working out also contributes to shedding extra pounds.

“I work out five to six days a week. I weight lift, I do Cross Fit one day, and I’ll do abs and cardio,” said Nguyen Nguyen junior health and exercise major.

“I was working out all break because there wasn’t the stress of school, but now I have to find time with school to work out,” Nguyen said.

Mattson advises students to take advantage of the rec center and the daily classes that are offered.

“You get encouragement from other people, which really helps,” Mattson said.

If fitting in an hour or two at the gym or in an exercise class is too much for your schedule, Mattson suggests not driving to school or taking the bus, but to ride your bike or walk there instead.

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Not getting enough sleep can also lead to many health issues down the line and affects brain function.  Many college students tend to not sleep much because the demands on students are high and many have jobs or are involved in extracurricular activities, as well as school.

“Sleep is a big deal,” Mattson said. “Especially while going to school, working and trying to be active.”

According to a sleep study conducted by the University of Georgia, most adults need six to 10 hours of sleep per night, but if you are sleeping more than an extra two hours per night on weekends, it means you’re not resting enough. The study also said it’s proven that not enough sleep can add to weight gain.

Losing the holiday pounds may not be as easy as it sounds, especially when school and work make for a busy schedule. But according to students majoring in health and exercise science, even a bike ride with friends, more sleep and drinking less soda can help you be and feel healthier.

Campus recreation declined to comment on the issue.

Collegian Writer Corrie Sahling can be reached at news@collegian.com.