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The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

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Keep Y Cross Ranch

Colorado State began as a land grant university in 1870 with the name of Colorado Agricultural College. In 1935, it took the name Colorado State College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts, or Colorado A & M.

Agriculture is where Colorado State began; it’s a central part of our heritage as students of this university. We have been, and still are to some extent, an Ag school.

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That heritage appears to be the reason why the Y Cross Ranch was gifted to both CSU and the University of Wyoming in 1997. After 14 years however, the two universities are attempting to sell the ranch which was donated to them.  The decision to sell the land, which incurred a lawsuit from the lands original owner, seems to be a departure from that heritage.

The former owner, Amy Davis has appealed the case to the Supreme Court of Wyoming, and is awaiting a verdict in the coming months.

The Y Cross Ranch was intended to be a learning center for ag students from both universities. Because of the ranch, students can acquire hands on knowledge for the subject they are passionate about. At yesterday’s court trial, students from both universities sided in favor of the ranch.

If the verdict for this case rules in favor of CSU, the university could potentially sell its portion of the ranch for $18 million.

Granted, $18 million is a lot of money, but having ownership in an 80 mile working ranch is a unique opportunity that most schools would jump at the chance of having.

We are a university famous for agriculture, let’s not forget our roots.

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