Boogie reveals frustrations on ‘Everything’s For Sale’

Miles Parrish

California based hip-hop artist Boogie, also known as “Westside Boogie,” is one of the latest signees to Eminem’s label, Shady Records. On Jan. 25, Boogie released his debut studio album “Everything’s For Sale” under the label. 

Image Courtesy of Shady Records

“Everything’s For Sale” shows Boogie and his struggles with self-introspection, and the processes he must go through to achieve the goals he sets for himself. Some of the most resounding lines comes from the first song, “Tired/Reflections“, in which Boogie says, “I’m tired of working at myself I want to be perfect already/I’m tired of the dating process I want to know what’s certain already/I’m tired of questioning if God’s real I wanna get murdered already.” These lyrics are not only relatable, but they also set the tone of the themes explored throughout the album.

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The fourth track/interlude “Lolsmh” takes on the traumatizing effects of Boogie’s relationships and his community, and how each of those feed into his depression. This track touches on topics like hiding sensitivities to avoid feeling vulnerable, being in unfulfilling relationships and questioning the presence of God in one’s life.

“I’m tired of working at myself I want to be perfect already/I’m tired of the dating process I want to know what’s certain already/I’m tired of questioning if God’s real I wanna get murdered already” -Boogie

The following track, “Soho” featuring Atlanta-based rapper J.I.D is a major highlight on the album. The song has great production and Boogie talks about the networking side of the music industry with the opening hook, “Please no more meeting at SoHo/Please no more thinking we bro bros.” Both Boogie and J.I.D express their disdain for people who only try to associate with them to have another connection. Both artists focus on prioritizing their own personal concerns instead of being involved with the games that the industry tries to force them into. Boogie closes the song with a quick verse about his obligations to turn away from his troubled and violent upbringing to achieve his dreams, while also commenting on the lack of solidarity between him and his community.

“Everything’s for Sale” can be listened to on Spotify and Apple Music. 

Skydive II” is another highlight, as Boogie discusses a failed relationship and questions why the nature of his life feels constantly toyed with by forces he can’t control. “Mother of my skies, why you always gotta intervene?/Father of my time, don’t you got some more to give to me?”

“Everything’s For Sale” carries a very gloomy, melancholy mood until the very end. There are occasional pockets of a more upbeat sound, but they are moreso playful jabs at the trends within hip-hop culture. Boogie spends most of his time coming to understand himself through his position within the industry and his position mentally with himself. He also faces achieving the life he’s striving for, despite the obstacles he’s constantly facing with his own shortcomings.

“Everything’s For Sale” documents a man finding his place in a society that doesn’t seem to want to support the identity that he is trying to create for himself. Boogie executes this message in a way that doesn’t just sound great, but honest as well.

Score: 7.5/10

Best song: Skydive II

Worst Song: Swap Meet

Miles Parrish can be reached at entertainment@collegian.com or on Twitter @parrishm20.