Lopez: Welcome to adulthood; let’s set some goals

Lopez%3A+Welcome+to+adulthood%3B+lets+set+some+goals

Collegian | Brian Peña

Dominique Lopez, Collegian Columnist

Editor’s Note: All opinion section content reflects the views of the individual author only and does not represent a stance taken by The Collegian or its editorial board.

With the new school year upon us, that means a year of new beginnings — a year of creating the changes and goals we hope to achieve throughout the year. The new school year creates a moment for us to rewrite the past, change the future and hold ourselves accountable for maintaining the new selves we strove to create in the beginning.

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Still, planning to achieve that success — or at the very least manifesting it — isn’t enough. There has to be a set standard, an idea of accountability tied to the success you strive to achieve.

Goal setting can have great success when used continuously throughout the years, and it is encouraged in academic settings, according to Positive Psychology. Encouragement of goal setting throughout college can come from professors at the beginning of their classes or from a mentor who wants to help you achieve everything you desire either socially or academically.

No matter the goal and whether it be long-term or short-term, you shouldn’t miss an opportunity to create these goals and ensure you are truly putting your best self into the school year. Despite the large number of goals we begin to set for ourselves, they can be more attainable with accountability taken by either ourselves or someone we respect.

The person who holds you accountable for your goal, whether it be a professor, mentor, friend or roommate, is a key part of ensuring your success.

“While the idea of just setting a goal and keeping it in the forefront of your mind can often be all that is necessary to complete and successfully stay on the path you have continuously tried to set for yourself, one of the most important things to realize is goals don’t always have to be dedicated to your schoolwork or social life.”

This idea of goal setting remains merely an idea without someone next to you pushing, questioning or holding you accountable to make sure that you are achieving what you set out to do right from the beginning, according to CNBC.

Even without that person nearby, there is still the idea of self-accountability that allows these goals to be achieved. Self-accountability could mean taking the time to check up on yourself, saving a bit of extra money so you could begin rewarding yourself for small accomplishments or choosing to reward yourself with doing something you enjoy.

Goals are an easy thing to set throughout the year or even from week to week because they keep you on your toes and keep you accountable for something more than just burying yourself in your schoolwork.

While the idea of just setting a goal and keeping it in the forefront of your mind can often be all that is necessary to complete and successfully stay on the path you have continuously tried to set for yourself, one of the most important things to realize is goals don’t always have to be dedicated to your schoolwork or social life.

Make your goals adaptable so you can find the success you need no matter how far or near in the future your goal may be. Goals are a part of life that continue to be set in motion and researched as a successful method for achievement. The biggest thing to remember is these goals are only attainable as long as you truly hope to achieve them and keep working toward them as a part of your daily life.

Reach Dominique Lopez at letters@collegian.com or on Twitter @caffeinateddee6.

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