The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

Spur campus Hydro building opens to the public

The+exterior+of+the+final+Colorado+State+University+Spur+building%2C+Hydro

Collegian | John Eisele/Colorado State Unive

The exterior of the final Colorado State University Spur building, Hydro, which opened this January. (Photo courtesy of the Colorado State University System)

Barnaby Atwood, Staff Reporter

Colorado State University Spur’s Hydro building opened its doors to the public Jan. 6, wrapping up the development of the Spur campus.

The CSU Spur campus is a non-degree granting campus that focuses on K-12 educational experiences to get younger people interested in learning and higher education in general.

Ad

The campus hosts three buildings Vida, Terra and Hydro that each have a respective focus on health, agriculture and water with several exhibits for guests to interact with.

“Our primary goal is to get kids really excited about careers in these fields and to let them know that there is an affordable way for them to go to college because we need all of that untapped human potential to help solve these great global challenges.” -Tony Frank, CSU System Chancellor

Vida hosts several veterinary services and exhibits live cat and dog surgeries; Terra focuses on agricultural science, culinary arts and food sustainability and Hydro focuses on water management and hosts Denver Water’s new water quality lab.

“When it comes to water management, it can be a zero-sum game,” said Jim Lochhead, CEO of Denver Water, at the Hydro building opening ceremony. “CSU Spur provides the nexus needed for all these interests to come together in developing collaborative solutions to the state and the West’s water challenges. It’s a win for all of us. We’re excited to be part of this partnership.”

The campus was made in collaboration with several organizations, most prominently the National Western Center, which the Spur campus resides in. The National Western Center is an agricultural hub that hosts several events, including the National Western Stock Show.

When the Western Stock Show Association was in the process of creating the National Western Center, they approached CSU asking if they would like to put up a facility with the center.

Tony Frank, the CSU System chancellor, said CSU was already looking to expand its brand to Denver, and this could be an opportunity to reach K-12 students who may feel they don’t have the resources to go to college.

“(At the time,) we had started to think we’ve got to find some way to get the message into the households where parents haven’t been to college that there’s an affordable pathway to college,” Frank said. “We wanted (K-12 students) to come in and see these wow-factor exhibits that were designed by professional K-12 educators that fit with their curriculum and were age appropriate. We wanted them to go home really excited, but we also want them to go home inoculated with the message for their teachers, for their guidance counselors, for their parents, that there is an affordable pathway to college for everybody.”

“Our primary goal is to get kids really excited about careers in these fields and to let them know that there is an affordable way for them to go to college because we need all of that untapped human potential to help solve these great global challenges,” Frank said.

The CSU Spur campus will be open during the National Western Stock Show Jan. 7-22.

Ad

Reach Barnaby Atwood at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @Barnaby_Atwood

Leave a Comment
About the Contributor
Photo of Serena Bettis
Serena Bettis, Editor in Chief

Serena Bettis is your 2022-23 editor in chief and is in her final year studying journalism and political science. In her three years at The Collegian,...

Navigate Left
  • Sound of Honeys lead singer Emma Rose joins Jesus Christ Taxi Driver for their headlining performance at the Aggie Theatre for the annual FoCoMX festival on April 19.

    Arts and Entertainment

    FoCoMX brings concert exposure to seasoned bands, newcomers

  • Many organizations set up tables on the Lory Student Center West Lawn for the Earth Day Festival April 22.

    Culture and Community

    Earth Day Festival unites in promoting sustainability, awareness

  • The Fort Collins Rescue Mission sign stands at its location and displays its mission statement, Changing Lives in the Name of Christ March 18.

    Culture and Community

    Sheltered by compassion: Reviewing refuges for unhoused people in NoCo

  • Passover Seder sees holiday celebrations with friends, family

    Culture and Community

    Passover Seder sees holiday celebrations with friends, family

  • Women high five and talk with one another.

    Homepage

    MW tennis preview: How CSU stacks up against rest of conference

  • Pavelko: Old-school teaching methods are more engaging

    Collegian Columnists

    Pavelko: Old-school teaching methods are more engaging

  • Colorado State University students dance to Ulupalakua at the Asian Pacific American Cultural Centers 40th anniversary luau April 20.

    Culture and Community

    APACC celebrates anniversary, Asian Pacific American heritage at luau

  • Senator Michael Bennet and former Senator Cory Gardner speak at the Colorado State University event Building Bridges: Bipartisan Perspectives on Democracy, moderated by CSU President Amy Parsons April 22.

    Campus

    Senators Bennet, Gardner discuss bipartisanship at CSU amid protests

  • Proulx: Im tired of having to vet TikTok influencers

    Collegian Columnists

    Proulx: I’m tired of having to vet TikTok influencers

  • A full audience listens to Alison Kafer speak at a lecture about reproductive ableism in the Lory Student Center April 18. I want us to think about how we need to make disability valued (and) make disabled people feel valued, Kafer said. Recognize their lives — our lives — as having futures so that abortion is no longer seen as a necessity. ... That will make it impossible, or at least much more difficult, for anti-abortion movements to weaponize or co-opt language of eugenics to do their work.

    Campus

    Feminist scholar visits CSU to discuss disability, reproductive justice

Navigate Right

Comments (0)

When commenting on The Collegian’s website, please be respectful of others and their viewpoints. The Collegian reviews all comments and reserves the right to reject comments from the website. Comments including any of the following will not be accepted. 1. No language attacking a protected group, including slurs or other profane language directed at a person’s race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, social class, age, physical or mental disability, ethnicity or nationality. 2. No factually inaccurate information, including misleading statements or incorrect data. 3. No abusive language or harassment of Collegian writers, editors or other commenters. 4. No threatening language that includes but is not limited to language inciting violence against an individual or group of people. 5. No links.
All The Rocky Mountain Collegian Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *