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The Rocky Mountain Collegian

The Student News Site of Colorado State University

The Rocky Mountain Collegian

52nd ASCSU senate begins ratifications, elections

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(Graphic Illustration by Christine Moore-Bonbright | The Collegian)

Piper Russell, News Reporter

The 51st senate of the Associated Students of Colorado State University held an emergency session May 4 to hear the bill “Approval of the FY23 Student Fee Package.” 2021-22 Vice President Merry Gebretsadik presented the bill, and the 51st senate voted to pass it. 

After the passing of the bill, the gavel was passed from Jackson Hunter to Nicholas DeSalvo. The 52nd senate began with the swearing in of senators and associate senators.

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The 52nd senate then moved on to the ratification and elections of officers, beginning with the chief justice-elect, Marcus Zacarias. Zacarias is a political science major and legal studies minor and previously served as an associate justice.

“His understanding for this system I think is truly unique, and it’s a skill set that will serve him very well in this role,” said Christian Dykson, former president.

Zacarias was ratified and sworn in as chief justice.

“We have in the past faced conflict within the space, so I would like to minimize the conflict in the space.” -Kimberly Carracedo, ASCSU speaker pro tempore

The senate held an election for speaker pro tempore. Noah Burge and Kimberly Carracedo were the two candidates. Burge was a senator for the College of Business.

“I think I’m most qualified because of the impact of organization, financial responsibility and community service,” Burge said. “I think those are the three big points as a business major. … I think it’s a big thing that we’ve seen brought to the position recently, is the aspect of really detailed organization and financial responsibility, making sure that we’re functioning as a senate space.”

Carracedo was a senator for El Centro and is studying political science and international studies. Carracedo spoke about her goals to aid the speaker of the senate and aid senators with legislation and any conflict that may arise.

“We have in the past faced conflict within the space, so I would like to minimize the conflict in the space,” Carracedo said.

Carracedo won the election and was sworn in as speaker pro tempore. Burge was later elected as parliamentarian.

The candidates for recruitment and retention officer were Sabina Gebru and Faraaz Bukhari.

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“Outreach is something that I’m good at; I feel that I’m a good communicator,” Gebru said. “I have a lot of outreach already within my community and other communities I’m in close contact with, and I work closely with the (Student Diversity Programs and Services) offices and other organizations across campus.”

Bukhari is studying health and exercise science and is a first-time senator for ASCSU.

“People come with the story,” Bukhari said. “Whether it be long or short, everyone’s had different chapters in their life. And if I can be a part of that, that’s awesome. If I can help move the pages along and show them where their passions lie, I really appreciate doing that in this role.”

ASCSU entered into a discussion and debate period over the candidates. Alex Silverhart expressed concerns that both candidates were not appropriate choices for the position because they were both new to ASCSU. However, Bukhari won the election and was sworn in as recruitment and retention officer.

ASCSU then moved on to ratify the executive cabinet. Many members of the new cabinet spoke about their excitement and the plans they have for their respective jobs in the future.

Haydyn Deason, an ecosystem science and sustainability major, was ratified as the chief of staff.

Benton Roesler was ratified as the director of housing security.

Kenneth Kinneer, a political science major, was ratified as director of environmental affairs. 

Jasen Wahler, a former senator for ASCSU, was ratified as secretary of state.

Faith Largo, a biology major, was ratified as director of campus community.

Charlie Williamson, a theater performance major and former senator, was ratified as director of diversity and inclusion.

Silverhart, a biomedical sciences major, former senator and former Budgetary Affairs Committee chair, was ratified as director of health and wellness.

Grace Crangle will return to her position as director of marketing. Crangle is studying communication studies.

Evan Welch, a political science major and former senator and University Affairs Committee chair, was ratified as director of governmental affairs.

Jillian Cook was ratified as director of finance. Cook is a data science major and agricultural business major who has worked on the Board for Student Organization Funding.

The last member of the executive cabinet was Jose Zermeno, who was ratified as director of traditions and programs. Zermeno is majoring in sociology, criminology and criminal justice.

After ratification of the executive cabinet, ASCSU held elections for committee chairs. Sammy Trout was elected as chair for the University Affairs Committee.

“Everything that affects the student population goes through this committee, and I’m excited to take on this responsibility,” Trout said.

Elizabeth Rencher was elected as chair for the Budgetary Affairs Committee.

“I really am excited to become more involved in ASCSU,” Rencher said.

Ariadne Athey was elected as chair for the Internal Affairs Committee.

“I have the knowledge to run the Internal Affairs Committee in a neutral but beneficial way, but as chair I can share that knowledge,” Athey said.

Later, ASCSU heard legislation for the night, starting with Resolution 5201, “Approval of the 52nd Senate Bylaws.” The resolution will be sent to all three committees.

The next piece of legislation was Bill 5201, “Legislative Job Descriptions.” The bill will be sent to all three committees.

The last piece of legislation was Lex 5201, “ASCSU Constitutional Amendment Act of May 2022,” which seeks to stop the nullification of 50th and 51st senate’s constitutional amendments. The lex will be sent to all three committees.

Reach Piper Russell at news@collegian.com or on Twitter @PiperRussell10. 

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Piper Russell, News Editor

Piper Russell is one of The Collegian’s news editors this year and is thrilled to be working in the role. She started as a news reporter her sophomore...

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